Etymology
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naturist (n.)

"participant in the movement for communal nudity," 1929, from nature + -ist. Earlier in other senses, including "naturalist" and "a physician who trusts entirely to nature for a cure" (1851). Related: Naturistic; naturism.

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-pathy 

word-forming element meaning "feeling, suffering, emotion; disorder, disease," from Latin -pathia, from Greek -patheia "act of suffering, feeling" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). Meaning "system of treatment of disease, method, cure, curative treatment" is abstracted from homeopathy (q.v.).

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psychopathy (n.)

1847, "derangement of the mental functions," from psycho- + -pathy, on the model of German Psychopathie. First attested in a translation of Feuchtersleben's "Lehrbuch der ärztlichen Seelenkunde" (1845). By 1891 as "cure of sickness by psychic influence or means" (hypnotism, etc.).

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icterus (n.)
"jaundice," 1706, medical Latin, from Greek ikteros "jaundice," also the name of a yellowish bird the sight of which was supposed, by sympathetic magic, to cure jaundice (but the bird died). As a zoological genus (American orioles), from 1713.
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therapy (n.)
1846, "medical treatment of disease," from Modern Latin therapia, from Greek therapeia "curing, healing, service done to the sick; a waiting on, service," from therapeuein "to cure, treat medically," literally "attend, do service, take care of" (see therapeutic).
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leech (v.)
"to cure, heal," c. 1200, from Old English also had a verb læcnian, from the source of leech (n.2). Meaning "to apply leeches medicinally" is from 1802 (implied in leeching), from leech (n.1). Related: Leeched.
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medical (adj.)

"pertaining or relating to the art or profession of healing or those who practice it," 1640s, from French médical, from Late Latin medicalis "of a physician," from Latin medicus "physician, surgeon, medical man" (n.); "healing, medicinal" (adj.), from medeor "to cure, heal," originally "know the best course for," from an early specialization of PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures" (source also of Avestan vi-mad- "physician"). "The meaning of medeor is based on a semantic shift from 'measure' to 'distribute a cure, heal'" [de Vaan]. The earlier adjective in English in this sense was medicinal. Related: Medically.

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metaphysician (n.)

"one versed in the science of metaphysics," mid-15c., perhaps from Old French methafisicien (14c., Modern French métaphysicien), or from metaphysic on the model of physician. In later colloquial use "one who practices the mind-cure," 1881.

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remediation (n.)

"action of remedying," now especially in teaching or physical therapy, 1818, noun of action from stem of Latin remediare, from remedium "a cure, remedy" (see remedy (n.)). In educational jargon by 1966; of pollution, by 1986. The latest uses might be fresh coinages from remediate (v.).

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-iatric 
word-forming element, from Latinized form of Greek iatrikos "healing," from iatros "physician, healer" (related to iatreun "treat medically," and iasthai "heal, treat"); of uncertain origin, perhaps from iaomai "to cure," related to iaino "heat, warm, cheer," probably from a root meaning "enliven, animate."
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