Etymology
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peewit (n.)

also pewit, "lapwing" (still the usual name for it in Scotland), also applied to various other birds, 1520s, imitative of its cry. Compare Flemish piewit-voghel; Dutch piewit, kiewit; Middle Low German kivit; German kiwitz; Russian chibezu "lapwing;" also see kibitz. Middle English had peuen, of a kite, "to cry plaintively" (early 15c.) and pewewe was given as the sound of the plaintive cry of some bird (mid-15c.).

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call (n.)

early 14c., "a loud cry, an outcry," also "a summons, an invitation," from call (v.). From 1580s as "a summons" (by bugle, drum, etc.) to military men to perform some duty; from 1680s as "the cry or note of a bird." Sense of "a short formal visit" is from 1862; meaning "a communication by telephone" is from 1878. From 1670s as "requirement, duty, right," hence, colloquially, "occasion, cause."

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tally-ho 
also tallyho, huntsman's cry to alert others that the game has been spotted, 1772, earlier in the name of a roistering character in English theater, Sir Toby Tallyho (Foote, 1756), from French taiaut, cry used in deer hunting (1660s), from Old French taho, tielau. Meaning "fast coach" is from 1823, originally in reference to the one that made the run from London to Birmingham.
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weep (v.)
Old English wepan "shed tears, cry; bewail, mourn over; complain" (class VII strong verb; past tense weop, past participle wopen), from Proto-Germanic *wopjan (source also of Old Norse op, Old High German wuof "shout, shouting, crying," Old Saxon wopian, Gothic wopjan "to shout, cry out, weep"), from PIE *wab- "to cry, scream" (source also of Latin vapulare "to be flogged;" Old Church Slavonic vupiti "to call," vypu "gull"). Of water naturally forming on stones, walls, etc., from c. 1400. Related: Wept; weeping; weeper.
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gecko (n.)
1774, from Malay (Austronesian) gekoq, said to be imitative of its cry. Earlier forms in English were chacco (1711), jackoa (1727).
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acclaim (v.)
early 14c., "to lay claim to," from Latin acclamare "to cry out at" (in Medieval Latin "to claim"), from ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + clamare "cry out" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). The meaning "to applaud" is recorded by 1630s. The spelling has been conformed to claim. Related: Acclaimed; acclaiming; acclamatory.
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banzai (interj.)
Japanese war-cry, 1893, literally "(may you live) ten thousand years," originally a greeting addressed to the emperor, from ban "ten thousand" + sai "year."
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chimney-sweep (n.)

"one whose occupation is the clearing of soot from chimneys," 1727, from their cry (attested from 1610s); see chimney + sweep (v.). The earlier noun was chimney-sweeper (c. 1500).

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killdeer (n.)
also killdee, species of large North American ring-plover, 1731, American English. The name is imitative of its shrill, two-syllable cry.
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ouch (interj.)

exclamation expressing pain, 1837, from Pennsylvania German outch, cry of pain, from German autsch. The Japanese word is itai. Latin used au, hau.

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