Etymology
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cross-beam (n.)

"large beam going from wall to wall; girder which holds the sides of a building or ship together," c. 1400, from cross- + beam (n.).

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cross-wind (n.)

also crosswind, "a wind which blows across the direct course," 1725, from cross- + wind (n.1).

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cross-lots (adv., prep.)

"by a short cut directly through fields or open lots, not by roads and streets," 1825, from cross- + lot.

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cross-purpose (n.)

1680s, "an opposing or counter purpose, a conflicting intention or plan," from cross- + purpose (n.). It is attested earlier as the name of a popular parlor game (1660s), and the phrase be at cross-purposes "have conflicting plans to attain the same end" (1680s) might be from the game.

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cross-tie (n.)

"transverse connecting piece of lumber," later especially "a railway tie, timber placed under opposite rails for support and to prevent spreading," from cross- + tie (n.).

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asker (n.)
"questioner," late 14c., agent noun from ask (v.).
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motocross 

also moto-cross, "cross-country motorcycle racing," by 1956, from motorcycle + cross-country.

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hybridization (n.)

"cross-fertilization, cross-breeding; act or process of hybridizing; state of being hybridized," 1824, noun of action from hybridize.

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crosswise (adv.)

"in the shape of a cross, crisscross, crossing perpendicularly," late 14c.; see cross- + wise (n.).

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crucifix (n.)

"a cross or representation of a cross with the crucified figure of Christ upon in," early 13c., from Old French crucefix (12c., Modern French crucifix), from Latin cruci fixus "(one) fixed to the cross" (see crucify).

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