Etymology
Advertisement
sushi (n.)

Japanese dish based on small clumps of boiled rice, 1893, from Japanese, where it is said originally to refer to the vinegared rice, not the raw fish that commonly garnishes it.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
materialize (v.)

also materialise, 1710, "represent as material," from material (adj.) + -ize. Meaning "reduce to a material basis or standard" is by 1820. Intransitive meaning "appear in bodily form, make physically perceptible" is by 1866, originally in spiritualism. Related: Materialized; materializing.

Related entries & more 
prejudice (v.)

mid-15c., prejudicen, "to injure or be detrimental to," from prejudice (n.) and from Old French prejudiciier. The meaning "to affect or fill with prejudice, create a prejudice (against)" is from c. 1600. Related: Prejudiced; prejudicing.

Related entries & more 
regender (v.)

also re-gender, c. 1400, "beget again, make or create afresh," a sense identified in OED as obsolete, from re- "back, again" + gender (v.) "bring forth, give birth." Related: Regendered; regendering.

Related entries & more 
form (v.)

c. 1300, formen, fourmen, "create, give life to, give shape or structure to; make, build, construct, devise," from Old French fourmer "formulate, express; draft, create, shape, mold" (12c.) and directly from Latin formare "to shape, fashion, build," also figurative, from forma "form, contour, figure, shape" (see form (n.)). From late 14c. as "go to make up, be a constituent part of;" intransitive sense "take form, come into form" is from 1722. Related: Formed; forming.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hell-raiser (n.)

1906 (to raise hell "create a ruckus" is from 1847, American English), from hell + agent noun from raise (v.). Related: Hell-raising. Probably not from the U.S. political cry "Kansas should raise less corn and more hell" (1900).

Related entries & more 
materially (adv.)

late 14c., "with, in, by, or with reference to matter or material things," from material (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "to an important extent or degree, essentially" is from 1650s.

Related entries & more 
hazmat 

also HAZMAT, 1977, telescoped from hazardous material(s).

Related entries & more 
materiel (n.)

"the totality of things used in the carrying out of any complex art or technique" (as distinguished from personnel), 1814, from French matériel "material," noun use of adj. matériel (see material (adj.)). A later borrowing of the same word that became material (n.). By 1819 in the specific sense of "articles, supplies, machinery, etc. used in the military."

Related entries & more 
sillabub (n.)

also sillibub, syllabub, sullibib, sillie bube, etc., "a drink or dish of raw milk and wine or cider, often sweetened," 1530s, a word of unknown origin. The figurative sense of "floridly vapid prose" is from 1706.

Related entries & more 

Page 4