Etymology
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mythopoeic (adj.)

"pertaining to the creation of myths, giving rise to myths," 1843, from Greek mythopoios, from mythos (see myth) + poiein "to make, create" (see poet). Related: Mythopoeist.

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sashimi (n.)

thin slices of raw fish served with ginger, soy sauce, etc., 1880, from Japanese, from sashi "to pierce" + mi "flesh."

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prejudice (v.)

mid-15c., prejudicen, "to injure or be detrimental to," from prejudice (n.) and from Old French prejudiciier. The meaning "to affect or fill with prejudice, create a prejudice (against)" is from c. 1600. Related: Prejudiced; prejudicing.

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rehash (n.)

"old material worked up anew, something concocted from material formerly used," usually of literary productions, 1849, from rehash (v.).

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sushi (n.)

Japanese dish based on small clumps of boiled rice, 1893, from Japanese, where it is said originally to refer to the vinegared rice, not the raw fish that commonly garnishes it.

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form (v.)
c. 1300, formen, fourmen, "create, give life to, give shape or structure to; make, build, construct, devise," from Old French fourmer "formulate, express; draft, create, shape, mold" (12c.) and directly from Latin formare "to shape, fashion, build," also figurative, from forma "form, contour, figure, shape" (see form (n.)). From late 14c. as "go to make up, be a constituent part of;" intransitive sense "take form, come into form" is from 1722. Related: Formed; forming.
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materialize (v.)

also materialise, 1710, "represent as material," from material (adj.) + -ize. Meaning "reduce to a material basis or standard" is by 1820. Intransitive meaning "appear in bodily form, make physically perceptible" is by 1866, originally in spiritualism. Related: Materialized; materializing.

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hell-raiser (n.)
1906 (to raise hell "create a ruckus" is from 1847, American English), from hell + agent noun from raise (v.). Related: Hell-raising. Probably not from the U.S. political cry "Kansas should raise less corn and more hell" (1900).
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regender (v.)

also re-gender, c. 1400, "beget again, make or create afresh," a sense identified in OED as obsolete, from re- "back, again" + gender (v.) "bring forth, give birth." Related: Regendered; regendering.

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brute (adj.)

early 15c., "of or belonging to animals, non-human," from Old French brut "coarse, brutal, raw, crude," from Latin brutus "heavy, dull, stupid, insensible, unreasonable" (source also of Spanish and Italian bruto), said to be an Oscan word, from PIE *gwruto-, suffixed form of root *gwere- (1) "heavy." Before reaching English the meaning expanded to "of the lower animals." Used in English of human beings from 1530s, "wanting in reason, blunt or dull of sentiment, unintelligent." The sense in brute force (1736) is "irrational, purely material."

Brute ... remains nearest to the distinguishing difference between man and beast, irrationality .... Brutish is especially uncultured, stupid, groveling .... Brutal implies cruelty or lack of feeling: as brutal language or conduct. [Century Dictionary]
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