Etymology
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bindle (n.)
"tramp's bundle," 1900, perhaps from bundle (n.) or Scottish dialectal bindle "cord or rope to bind things." Related: Bindlestiff "tramp who carries a bindle" (1901).
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withe (n.)

Old English wiððe "twisted cord, tough, flexible twig used for binding, especially a willow twig," from PIE *withjon-, from root *wei- "to turn, twist."

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neuron (n.)

"a nerve cell with its appendages," 1891, from German Neuron, from Greek neuron (see neuro-). Used earlier (1884) for "the spinal cord and brain, considered as one."

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jumper (n.1)
"one who jumps," 1610s, agent noun from jump (v.). In basketball, "jump-shot," from 1934. The meaning "basket on an elastic cord permitting a small child to push off the floor" is short for baby-jumper (1848).
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lash (v.2)

"to tie or bind," as with rope or cord, 1620s, originally nautical, from French lachier, from Old French lacier "to lace on, fasten with laces; entrap, ensnare" (see lace (v.)). Related: Lashed; lashing.

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umbilical (adj.)
"pertaining to the navel," 1540s, from Medieval Latin umbilicalis "of the navel," from Latin umbilicus "navel" (see umbilicus). Umbilical cord attested by 1753 (the native term is navel string).
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meningitis (n.)

"inflammation of the membranes of the brain or spinal cord," 1825, coined from Modern Latin meninga, from Greek meninx (genitive meningos) "membrane," in medical Latin especially that of the brain (see member) + -itis "inflammation." Related: Meningitic.

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latchet (n.)
"strap or thong of a sandal or shoe," late 14c., lachet, from Old French lachet, variant of lacet, diminutive of las, laz "noose, string, cord, tie" (see lace (n.)). Spelling altered perhaps by influence of latch.
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meninges (n.)

plural of meninx, 1610s, "one of the three membranes enveloping the brain and spinal cord," from French meninges (1530s) or directly from medical Latin meninx, from Greek meninx (genitive meningos) "membrane," in medical Latin especially that of the brain (see member).

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lace (n.)
early 13c., laz, "cord made of braided or interwoven strands of silk, etc.," from Old French laz "a net, noose, string, cord, tie, ribbon, or snare" (Modern French lacs), from Vulgar Latin *lacium, from Latin laqueum (nominative laqueus) "a noose, a snare" (source also of Italian laccio, Spanish lazo, English lasso), a trapping and hunting term, probably from Italic base *laq- "to ensnare" (compare Latin lacere "to entice").

Later also "net, noose, snare" (c. 1300); and "piece of cord used to draw together the edges of slits or openings in an article of clothing" (late 14c., as preserved in shoelace). In Middle English it mostly had the sense "cord, thread," especially for tying or binding. It was used of fishing lines and perhaps the gallows rope, crossbeams in architecture, and the net Vulcan used to catch Venus in adultery. Death's lace was the icy grip of Death, and Love's lace was a binding love.

From 1540s as "ornamental cord or braid," hence the meaning "fabric of fine threads in a patterned ornamental open net" (1550s), which soon became the main meaning of the English word. "Century Dictionary" (1902) describes by name 87 varieties. As an adjective, lace-curtain "middle class" (or lower-class with middle-class pretensions), often used in reference to Irish-Americans, is attested by 1928.
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