Etymology
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implicate (v.)
early 15c., "to convey (truth) in a fable," from Latin implicatus, past participle of implicare "to involve, entwine, entangle, embrace," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). From c. 1600 as "intertwine, wreathe." Meaning "involve (someone) in a crime, charge, etc.; show (someone) to be involved" is from 1797. Related: Implicated; implicating.
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support (v.)

late 14c., "to aid," also "to hold up, prop up, put up with, tolerate," from Old French suporter "to bear, endure, sustain, support" (14c.), from Latin supportare "convey, carry, bring up, bring forward," from assimilated form of sub "up from under" (see sub-) + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Related: Supported; supporting.

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convex (adj.)

"curved like a circle or sphere when viewed from outside," 1570s, from French convexe, from Latin convexus "vaulted, arched," past participle of convehere "to bring together," from assimilated form of com "with, together," or "thoroughly" (see com-) + vehere "to bring, carry, convey" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle").

Possibly the notion is of vaults "carried together" to meet at the point of a roof. Related: Convexity. Convex lens is from 1822.

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carrier (n.)
late 14c., "one who or that which conveys," agent noun from carry (v.). Meaning "person or animal that carries and disseminates infection without suffering obvious disease" is from 1899; genetic sense is 1933. As a short form of aircraft carrier it dates from 1917. Carrier-pigeon, one of a breed trained to convey from one place to another written messages tied to its leg (also homing-pigeon), is from 1640s.
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important (adj.)

mid-15c., "significant, of much import, bearing weight or consequence," from Medieval Latin importantem (nominative importans) "important, momentous," present-participle adjective from importare "be significant in," from Latin importare "bring in, convey, bring in from abroad," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." The meaning "pretentious, pompous" is from 1713. Related: Importantly. Compare import (v.) and (n.).

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ferry (v.)

Old English ferian "to carry, convey, bring, transport" (in late Old English, especially over water), from Proto-Germanic *farjan "to ferry" (source also of Old Frisian feria "carry, transport," Old Norse ferja "to pass over, to ferry," Gothic farjan "travel by boat"), from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Related to fare (v.). Related: Ferried; ferries; ferrying.

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purport (n.)

early 15c., "meaning, tenor, the surface or expressed meaning of a document, etc.; that which is conveyed or expressed," from Anglo-French purport (late 13c.), Old French porport "contents, tenor," back-formation from purporter "to contain, convey, carry; intend," from pur- (from Latin pro- "forth;" see pur-) + Old French porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Meaning "that which is to be done or effected" is from 1650s.

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tycoon (n.)
1857, title given by foreigners to the shogun of Japan (said to have been used by his supporters when addressing foreigners, as an attempt to convey that the shogun was more important than the emperor), from Japanese taikun "great lord or prince," from Chinese tai "great" + kiun "lord." Transferred meaning "important person" is attested from 1861, in reference to U.S. president Abraham Lincoln (in the diary of his secretary, John Hay); specific application to "wealthy and powerful businessman" is post-World War I.
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assign (v.)

c. 1300, "to transfer, convey, bequeath (property); appoint (to someone a task to be done); order, direct (someone to do something); fix, settle, determine; appoint or set (a time); indicate, point out," from Old French assigner "assign, set (a date, etc.); appoint legally; allot" (13c.), from Latin assignare/adsignare "to mark out, to allot by sign, assign, award," from ad "to" (see ad-) + signare "make a sign," from signum "identifying mark, sign" (see sign (n.)). Its original use was in legal transfers of personal property. Related: Assigned; assigning.

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post (n.3)

[mail system] c. 1500, "riders and horses posted at intervals," to provide direct and rapid communication of messages and letters from one place to another by relays, from post (n.2) on notion of riders and horses "posted" at intervals along a route. Probably formed on model of French poste in this sense (late 15c.).

The meaning "system for the conveyance of letters" is from 1660s; it is attested from 1590s in the sense of "vehicle used to convey mails;" 1670s as "a dispatch of letters from or to a place." As a newspaper name from 1680s.

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