Etymology
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popularity (n.)

"fact or condition of being beloved by the people, popular character or quality," c. 1600, from French popularité (15c.), from popular + -ity. Classical Latin popularitas meant "fellow-citizenship, a being of the same country." Popularity contest is attested from 1880.

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non-starter (n.)

also nonstarter, "one who does not start a race, contest, etc.," hence "ineffectual person or impracticable idea," 1909, from non-  + starter.

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infirmity (n.)

late 14c., infirmite, "disease, sickness; lack of capability, weakness," from Old French infirmité, enfermete "illness, sickness, disease; moral weakness," and directly from Latin infirmitatem (nominative infirmitas) "want of strength, weakness, feebleness," also "the weaker sex" [Lewis], noun of quality from infirmus "weak, frail" (see infirm). 

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curation (n.)

late 14c., curacioun, "curing of disease, restoration to health," from Old French curacion "treatment of illness," from Latin curationem (nominative curatio), "a taking care, attention, management," especially "medical attention," noun of action from past-participle stem of curare "to cure" (see cure (v.)). From 1769 as "management, guardianship."

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scoreboard (n.)

also score-board, 1826, "blackboard in a tavern on which debts are chalked," from score (n.) + board (n.1). By 1884 as a display of the tally on a sports contest or game.

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rubber (n.2)

"deciding match" in a game or contest, usually a third where each has won one, 1590s, a word of unknown origin and signification; even the original form is uncertain. Not obviously connected to rubber (n.1). 

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tourney (n.)
c. 1300, from Anglo-French turnei, Old French tornei "contest of armed men" (12c., Modern French tournoi), from tornoier "to joust, tilt" (see tourney (v.)).
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shaking (n.)

late 14c., "trembling or shivering caused by illness, infirmity, fear, etc.," also "act or process of moving with a rapid, vibratory motion;" verbal noun from shake (v.). The Shaking of the Sheets is mentioned from 1580s as the name of a dance and tune, and in 16c.-17c. also was a euphemism for sexual intercourse.

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disease (n.)

early 14c., "discomfort, inconvenience, distress, trouble," from Old French desaise "lack, want; discomfort, distress; trouble, misfortune; disease, sickness," from des- "without, away" (see dis-) + aise "ease" (see ease (n.)). Restricted pathological sense of "sickness, illness" in English emerged by late 14c.; the word still sometimes was used in its literal sense early 17c., and was somewhat revived 20c., usually with a hyphen (dis-ease).

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neutral (n.)

mid-15c., "one who takes no part in a contest between others, one who has a neutral opinion," from Latin neutralis "of neuter gender," (see neutral (adj.)). Meaning "disengaged position in gear mechanisms" is by 1905.

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