Etymology
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boyfriend (n.)

also boy-friend, "favorite male companion" (with implication of romantic connection), "a woman's paramour," 1909, from boy + friend (n.). It was attested earlier in a non-romantic sense of "juvenile male companion" (1850).

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complex (n.)

1650s, "a whole comprised of interconnected parts," from complex (adj.). Latin completus as a noun meant "a surrounding, embracing, connection, relation." Psychological sense of "connected group of repressed ideas" was established by C.G. Jung, 1907.

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disengage (v.)

c. 1600 in figurative sense "loosen from that which entangles;" 1660s in literal sense of "detach, release from connection," from dis- "do the opposite of" + engage (q.v.). Intransitive sense of "withdraw, become separated" is from 1640s. Related: Disengaged; disengaging.

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bloom (n.2)

"rough mass of wrought iron," from Old English bloma "lump of metal; mass," which is of unknown origin. Identical in form to bloom (n.1), and sometimes regarded as a secondary sense of it, but evidence of a connection is wanting.

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scads (n.)

"large amounts," 1869, American English, earlier "a dollar" (1855, usually in plural), a word of uncertain origin. Unknown connection to scad, the fish, which, along the British coasts, were often very abundant and occasionally seen in immense shoals.

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concomitance (n.)

"a being together or in connection with another," 1530s, from French concomitance or directly from Medieval Latin concomitantia, from Late Latin concomitantem (see concomitant). In theology, "the coexistence of the blood and body of Christ in the bread of the Eucharist." Related: Concomitancy.

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riddance (n.)

1530s, "a cleaning out, removal, clearance," from rid + -ance. The meaning "a deliverance from something superfluous or unwanted" is from 1590s. Good riddance, "a welcome relief from unpleasant company or an embarrassing connection" attested from 1650s. Shakespeare has gentle riddance (1590s); Middleton has fair riddance (1610s).

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dial (v.)

1650s, "to work with aid of a dial or compass; measure with or as with a dial," from dial (n.). Sense of "rotate the dial plate of a telephone to indicate the number to which a connection is to be established" is from 1921. Related: Dialed; dialing.

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Finn (n.)

"native or inhabitant of Finland; a member of the Finnic race,"  Old English finnas, from Old Norse finnr, the Norsemen's name for the Suomi. Some suggest a connection with fen. Attested in Tacitus as Fenni. Finlander in English is from 1727.

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skittles (n.)

game played with nine pins, 1630s, plural of skittle, the word for the pins used in the game, probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish and Norwegian skyttel "shuttle, child's toy"). But OED says there is no evidence of a connection.

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