Etymology
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confluent (adj.)

"flowing together, meeting in their courses," late 15c., from Latin confluentem (nominative confluens), present participle of confluere "to flow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). The noun meaning "a stream which flows into another" is from 1850.

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conjunct (adj.)

"conjoined, conjoint," mid-15c., from Latin coniunctus, past participle of coniugare "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iugare "to join," from iugum "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). A doublet of conjoint.

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contractile (adj.)

"susceptible of contraction," 1706, from French contractile, from Latin contract-, past participle stem of contrahere "to draw several objects together; draw in, shorten," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)). Related: Contractility.

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conflagrate (v.)

1650s, "to catch fire," from Latin conflagratus, past participle of conflagrare "to burn, consume," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow" (from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn"). Transitive meaning "to set on fire" is from 1835.

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cun (v.)

"to learn to know, inquire into," from Old English cunnian "to learn to know," ultimately from the same ancient root as can (v.1) and compare con (v.3). Surviving into 17c. and perhaps later in dialects. Also compare cunning.

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configure (v.)

late 14c. (implied in configured) "to form, dispose in a certain form," from Latin configurare "to fashion after a pattern," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + figurare "to form, shape," from figura "a shape, form, figure" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Related: Configuring.

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convocate (v.)

"to convoke, call or summon to meet," 1540s, from Latin convocatus, past participle of convocare "to call together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vocare "to call," a verbal derivative of vox "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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contribute (v.)

1520s, "to give or grant in common with others," from Latin contributus, past participle of contribuere "to bring together, add, unite, collect, contribute" from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tribuere "to allot, pay" (see tribute). Figurative sense is from 1630s. Related: Contributed; contributing.

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converge (v.)

1690s, "to tend to meet in a point or line," from Late Latin convergere "to incline together" from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vergere "to bend, turn, tend toward" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Related: Converged; converging.

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confraternity (n.)

"brotherhood, society of men united for some purpose or in some profession," late 15c., from Old French confraternité (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin confraternitas, from confrater, from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + frater "brother" (from PIE root *bhrater- "brother").

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