Etymology
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*mei- (1)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to change, go, move," "with derivatives referring to the exchange of goods and services within a society as regulated by custom or law" [Watkins].

It forms all or part of: amiss; amoeba; azimuth; common; commune; communicate; communication; communism; commute; congee; demean; emigrate; emigration; excommunicate; excommunication; immune; immutable; incommunicado; mad; mean (adj.1) "low-quality;" mew (n.2) "cage;" mews; migrate; migration; mis- (1) "bad, wrong;" mistake; Mithras; molt; Mstislav; municipal; munificent; mutable; mutant; mutate; mutation; mutatis mutandis; mutual; permeable; permeate; permutation; permute; remunerate; remuneration; transmutation; transmute; zenith.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit methati "changes, alternates, joins, meets;" Avestan mitho "perverted, false;" Hittite mutai- "be changed into;" Latin mutare "to change," meare "to go, pass," migrare "to move from one place to another," mutuus "done in exchange;" Old Church Slavonic mite "alternately;" Czech mijim "to go by, pass by," Polish mijać "avoid;" Gothic maidjan "to change."
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folky (adj.)
"characteristic of the common people," 1914, from folk + -y (2). Old English had folcisc "popular, secular, common."
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plebeian (n.)

"member of the lowest class or the common people," 1530s, from Latin plebius "person not of noble rank," from adjective meaning "of the common people" (see plebeian (adj.)).

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cenogamy (n.)

also coenogamy, "state of having husbands or wives in common," 1883,  from Latinized form of Greek koinos "common" (see coeno-) + -gamy. Related: Cenogamous; coenogamous.

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Bros. 
common commercial abbreviation of Brothers.
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coeno- 

before vowels coen-, word-forming element meaning "common," from Latinized form of Greek koinos "common, public, shared, general, ordinary," from PIE *kom "beside, near, by, with" (see com-).

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Vulgate (n.)
Latin translation of the Bible, especially that completed in 405 by St. Jerome (c.340-420), c. 1600, from Medieval Latin Vulgata, from Late Latin vulgata "common, general, ordinary, popular" (in vulgata editio "popular edition"), from Latin vulgata, fem. past participle of vulgare "make common or public, spread among the multitude," from vulgus "the common people" (see vulgar). So called because the translations made the book accessible to the common people of ancient Rome.
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demotic (adj.)

"of or belonging to the people," especially "pertaining to the common people, popular, vulgar," 1822, from Latinized form of Greek dēmotikos "of or for the common people, in common use," from dēmos "common people," originally "district," from PIE *da-mo- "division," from root *da- "to divide." Originally in English it was used in reference to the simpler of two forms of ancient Egyptian writing (opposed to hieratic or hieroglyphic); the broader sense is by 1831. Used of the popular form of modern Greek since 1927.

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pool (v.2)

"to make a common interest or fund, put things into one common fund or stock for the purpose of dividing or redistribution in certain proportions," 1871, from pool (n.2). Related: Pooled; pooling.

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