Etymology
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Samson 

masc. proper name, Jewish strong-man (Judges xiii-xvi), from Late Latin Samson, Sampson, from Greek Sampsōn, from Hebrew Shimshon, probably from shemesh "sun." As a generic name for a man of great strength, attested from 1565. Samsonite, proprietary name for a make of luggage (with -ite (1)), is 1939, by Shwayder Bros. Inc., Denver, Colorado. Earlier it was a type of dynamite (1909).

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Caliban (n.)
"degraded and bestial man," from the name of Shakespeare's character in "The Tempest" (1610), which is from a version of cannibal with -n- and -l- interchanged found in Hakluyt's "Voyages" (1599).
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Enos 
masc. proper name, in Old Testament the son of Seth, from Greek Enos, from Hebrew Enosh, literally "man" (compare nashim "women," Arabic ins "men, people").
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Llanfair 
common in Welsh place names, literally "St. Mary's Church," from Welsh llan "church" (see land (n.)) + Mair "Mary," with lentition of m- to f-.
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Shannon 

river in Ireland, the name is said to mean something like "old man river," from a Proto-Celtic word related to Irish sean "old" (from PIE root *sen- "old").

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Clark 

also Clarke, surname, from common Middle English alternative spelling of clerk (n.). In many early cases it is used of men who had taken minor orders.

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Kelly 
common Irish surname, from Old Irish ceallach "war." As a type of pool played with 15 balls, it is attested from 1898. Kelly green first recorded 1917.
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Andromeda 

northern constellation, 1667 (earlier Andromece, mid-15c.), from Greek, literally "mindful of her husband," from andros, genitive of anēr "man" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man") + medesthai "to be mindful of, think on," related to medea (neuter plural) "counsels, plans, devices, cunning" (and source of the name Medea). In classical mythology the daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia, she was bound to a rock to be destroyed by the sea monster Cetus, but was rescued by Perseus, mounted on Pegasus. The whole group was transferred to the Heavens (except the rock).

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Broadway 
common street name, c. 1300 as "a wide road or street," from broad (adj.) + way (n.); the allusive use for "New York theater district" is first recorded 1881.
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Betty 
fem. pet name, from Bet, shortened from Elizabeth, + -y (3). Also in old slang (by 1857), "man who interferes with the domestic duties of women" [Century Dictionary, 1889].
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