Etymology
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androgynous (adj.)

1620s, "womanish" (of a man); 1650s, "having two sexes, being both male and female," from Latin androgynus, from Greek androgynos "hermaphrodite, male and female in one; womanish man;" as an adjective (of baths) "common to men and women," from andros, genitive of anēr "male" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man") + gynē "woman" (from PIE root *gwen- "woman"). Related: Androgynal (1640s).

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caroline (adj.)
1650s, "of or pertaining to a Charles," from French, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Especially of Charlemagne, or, in English history, Charles I and Charles II.
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Jock 
c. 1500, variant of the masc. proper name Jack, the by-form of John. In Scotland and northern England it is the usual form. Since 1520s, like Jack, it has been used generically, as a common appellative of lads and servants, as the name of a typical man of the common folk, of a Scottish or North Country seaman, etc.
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Mac 

casual, generic term of address for a man, 1928, from Irish and Gaelic mac, a common element in Scottish and Irish names (literally "son of;" see Mac-); hence used generally from 1650s for "a Celtic Irishman."

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Carolingian (adj.)
1881, "belonging to the Frankish royal and imperial dynasty founded by Charles Martel, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Also compare Carlovingian.
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Carol 
masc. proper name, from Medieval Latin Carolus, which is of Germanic origin, from the common noun meaning "man, husband" (see carl). As a fem. proper name, an abbreviation of Caroline. The masc. name never has been popular in U.S.; the fem. form was common after c. 1900 and was a top-10 name for U.S. girls born 1936-1950.
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mick (n.)

also Mick, derogatory slang for "an Irishman," by 1856, from the nickname form of the common Irish given name Michael (q.v.). Micky is attested in U.S. slang for "an Irish boy or man" by 1858.

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dell (n.2)

rogue's cant 16c.-17c. for "a wench, a young girl of the vagrant class," 1560s, of uncertain origin.

A Dell is a yonge wenche, able for generation, and not yet knowen or broken by the vpright man. ... [W]hen they have beene lyen with all by the vpright man then they be Doxes, and no Dells. [Thomas Harman, "A Caveat or Warning for Common Cursitors," 1567]
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Serb (n.)

1786, but in reference to the Wends; by 1844 as "native of Serbia," from Serbian Srb, perhaps from a root meaning "man." Serbian is attested from 1833 as an adjective, 1839 as a noun. More common in 19c. was Servian.

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Carl 
masc. proper name, from continental sources such as Danish Carl, Middle High German Karl, from the common noun meaning "man, husband" (see carl). The Carlists in 19c. Spain were partisans of Don Carlos de Borbon.
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