Etymology
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pool (v.2)

"to make a common interest or fund, put things into one common fund or stock for the purpose of dividing or redistribution in certain proportions," 1871, from pool (n.2). Related: Pooled; pooling.

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communication (n.)
Origin and meaning of communication

early 15c., "act of communicating, act of imparting, discussing, debating, conferring," from Old French comunicacion (14c., Modern French communication) and directly from Latin communicationem (nominative communicatio) "a making common, imparting, communicating; a figure of speech," noun of action from past-participle stem of communicare "to share, divide out; communicate, impart, inform; join, unite, participate in," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "that which is communicated" is from late 15c.; meaning "means of communication" is from 1715. Related: Communications; communicational.

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miniscule 

a common misspelling of minuscule attested from late 19c.

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unctious (adj.)
common variant of unctuous c. 1600-1725.
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communicate (v.)

1520s, "to impart (information, etc.); to give or transmit (a quality, feeling, etc.) to another," from Latin communicatus, past participle of communicare "to share, communicate, impart, inform," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "to share, transmit" (diseases, etc.) is from 1530s. Intransitive sense, of rooms, etc., "to open into each other" is from 1731. Related: Communicated; communicating.

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wassup (interj.)
slang form of common greeting what's up?, popular 2000.
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c/o 
addressing abbreviation for care of; common by 1889.
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divulge (v.)

mid-15c., divulgen, "make public, send or scatter abroad" (now obsolete in this general sense), from Latin divulgare "publish, make common," from assimilated form of dis- "apart" (see dis-) + vulgare "make common property," from vulgus "common people" (see vulgar). Sense of "to tell or make known something formerly private or secret" is from c. 1600. Related: Divulged; divulging.

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crawfish (n.)

common name of small, long-tailed freshwater crustaceans, 1620s, a variant of crayfish (q.v.) common in the U.S., but not originally an American form. Also in 19c. American English as a verb, "to back out," in reference to the creature's movements.

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badder (adj.)
obsolete or colloquial comparative of bad (adj.), common 14c.-18c.
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