Etymology
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commodious (adj.)

early 15c., "beneficial, convenient," from Old French commodios and directly from Medieval Latin commodiosus "convenient, useful," from Latin commodus "proper, fit, appropriate, convenient, satisfactory,"  from com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + modus "measure, manner" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). Meaning "conveniently roomy, spacious" is attested from 1550s. Related: Commodiously; commodiousness.

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completion (n.)

"act of bringing to a desired end, consummation, full development," late 14c., complecioun, from Medieval Latin completionem (nominative completio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin complere "to fill up, complete," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").

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confit 

"food cooked very slowly in fat," by 1975, from French confit, past participle of confire "to preserve," from Latin conficere "to prepare," from assimilated form of com- "with" (see com-) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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commemoration (n.)

late 14c., "a calling to mind," also "service or church festival commemorating something," from Old French comemoration, from Latin commemorationem (nominative commemoratio) "reminding, mention," noun of action from past participle stem of commemorare "to call to mind," from com-, here as an intensive prefix (see com-), + memorare "to remind," from memor "mindful of" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember").

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collaborator (n.)

1802, "an associate in labor, one who works with another," from French collaborateur (which also sometimes was used in English), from Latin collaboratus, past participle of collaborare "to work with," from assimilated form of com "with" (see com-) + laborare "to work" (see labor (v.)).

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correspondent (adj.)

early 15c., "having an analogous relationship (to), answering, matching," a sense taken up since 19c. by corresponding; from Medieval Latin correspondentem, present participle of correspondere "correspond, harmonize, reciprocate," from assimilated form of com "together, with (each other)" (see com-) + respondere "to answer" (see respond).

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congratulation (n.)

mid-15c., from Latin congratulationem (nominative congratulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of congratulari "wish joy," from com "together, with" (see com-) + gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

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coeval (adj.)

"having the same age, having lived for an equal period," 1620s, from Late Latin coaevus"of the same age," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + aevum "an age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity"). As a noun from c. 1600.

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compendium (n.)

"brief compilation containing the general principles or leading points of a longer system or work," 1580s, from a Medieval Latin use of Latin compendium "a shortening, saving," literally "that which is weighed together," from compendere "to weigh together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh; pay" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Nativized earlier in English as compendi (mid-15c.).

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commensal (adj.)

late 14c., "eating together at the same table, sharing the table with the host," from Medieval Latin commensalis, from com "with, together" (see com-) + mensa (genitive mensalis) "table" (see mesa). 

As a noun, "one who eats at the same table" (as another), early 15c. Biological sense "one of two animals or plants which live together but neither at the expense of the other" is attested from 1870.

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