Etymology
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hop-head (n.)

also hophead, "opium addict," 1911, from hop (n.2) + head (n.) in the drug sense.

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jolt-head (n.)

"a stupid head," 1530s; later also "a big, clumsy, stupid person." The origin and signification of jolt here is unknown.

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head over heels (adv.)

1726, "a curious perversion" [Weekley] of Middle English heels over head (late 14c.) "somersault fashion," hence "recklessly." Head (n.) and heels long have been paired in alliterative phrases in English, and the whole image also was in classical Latin (per caput pedesque ire).

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cudgel (n.)

"short, thick stick used as a weapon," Old English cycgel "club with rounded head;" perhaps from PIE *geu- "to curve, bend."

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nightclub (n.)

also night-club, "club open at night," 1894, from night + club (n.) in the social sense.

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clubbable (adj.)

"having qualities that make one fit to be a member of a social club," 1783, from club (n.) + -able.

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clubbed (adj.)

late 14c., "shaped like a club, thick at the end," from club (n.). Specifically of defects of the foot by c. 1500; meaning "formed into a club" is from 1620s.

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Soroptimist 

international society of business women and women executives, first club formed 1921 in Oakland, Calif., U.S., from stem of sorority + optimist, probably after the Optimist Club.

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putter (n.)

late 14c., "beast that pushes with the head;" early 15c., "one who puts or places," agent noun from put (v.). Meaning "one who throws (a stone or other heavy weight)" is by 1820. As a type of golf club with a stiff and comparatively short staff, used when the ball lies a short distance from the hole, by 1743; see putt (v.).

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