Etymology
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anatomy (n.)
Origin and meaning of anatomy

late 14c., "study or knowledge of the structure and function of the human body" (learned by dissection); c. 1400, "anatomical structure," from Old French anatomie and directly from Late Latin anatomia, from late Greek anatomia for classical anatomē "dissection," literally "a cutting up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + temnein "to cut" (from PIE root *tem- "to cut").

"Dissection" (1540s), "mummy" (1580s), and "skeleton" (1590s) were primary senses of this word in Shakespeare's day; the meaning "the science of the structure of organized bodies" predominated from 17c. Of persons, "the body," from 1590s. Often misdivided as an atomy or a natomy (see N).

The scyence of the Nathomy is nedefull and necessarye to the Cyrurgyen [1541]
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nativize (v.)

1933, in linguistics, "adapt (a loan-word) to the phonetic structure of the native language," from native (adj.) + -ize. Related: Nativized; nativizing.

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classify (v.)

"arrange in a class or classes, arrange according to common characteristics," 1782, from French classifier, from classe (see class (n.)) + -fier (see -fy). Related: Classified; classifying.

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classroom (n.)

also class-room, "room in which school lessons are taught," 1811, from class (n.) + room (n.).

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lookdown (n.)
type of sea fish, 1882, from look (v.) + down (adv.). So called from facial structure. Also known as moonfish, horsehead.
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porphyrite (n.)

1796 as a modern mineral name for a rock of porphyritic structure, from porphyry + -ite (2). Related: Porphyritic (early 15c., porphiritike).

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framework (n.)
1640s, "structure for enclosing or supporting," from frame (n.) + work (n.). Figurative sense "adjusted arrangement" is from 1816.
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crustacean (n.)

an animal of the class Crustacea, 1835; see Crustacea + -an. As an adjective, "of or pertaining to an animal of the class Crustacea," 1858 (an earlier adjective was crustaceous, "pertaining to crust, crust-like," 1640s).

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mole (n.3)

"massive structure used as a breakwater," 1540s, from French môle "breakwater" (16c.), ultimately from Latin moles "mass, massive structure, barrier," perhaps from PIE root *mō- "to exert oneself" (source also of Greek molos "effort," molis "hardly, scarcely;" German mühen "to tire," müde "weary, tired;" Russian majat' "to fatigue, exhaust," maja "hard work").

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backstairs (n.)
"stairs at the back of a structure," 1650s, from back (adj.) + stairs (see stair). Figurative use is attested earlier (1640s).
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