Etymology
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sedition (n.)

mid-14c., "rebellion, uprising, revolt, concerted attempt to overthrow civil authority; violent strife between factions, civil or religious disorder, riot; rebelliousness against authority," from Old French sedicion (14c., Modern French sédition) and directly from Latin seditionem (nominative seditio) "civil disorder, dissension, strife; rebellion, mutiny," literally "a going apart, separation," from se- "apart" (see secret (n.)) + itio "a going," from ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").

Meaning "conduct or language inciting to rebellion against a lawful government" is from 1838. An Old English word for it was folcslite. Less serious than treason, as wanting an overt act, "But it is not essential to the offense of sedition that it threaten the very existence of the state or its authority in its entire extent" [Century Dictionary].

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postwar (adj.)

also post-war, "being or occurring after a (particular) war," 1906, in reference to the U.S. Civil War, a hybrid from post- + war (n.). Compare post-bellum.

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jack-knife (v.)
1776, "to stab," from jack-knife (n.). Intransitive meaning "to fold or bend" the body is said to date from the time of the American Civil War. The truck accident verbal sense is from 1949. Related: Jackknifed; jackknifing.
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engineer (n.)
mid-14c., enginour, "constructor of military engines," from Old French engigneor "engineer, architect, maker of war-engines; schemer" (12c.), from Late Latin ingeniare (see engine); general sense of "inventor, designer" is recorded from early 15c.; civil sense, in reference to public works, is recorded from c. 1600 but not the common meaning of the word until 19c (hence lingering distinction as civil engineer). Meaning "locomotive driver" is first attested 1832, American English. A "maker of engines" in ancient Greece was a mekhanopoios.
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parliamentarian (n.)

1640s as a designation of one of the sides in the English Civil War (a partisan or supporter of Parliament as opposed to the King); meaning "one versed in parliamentary procedure" dates from 1834. See parliamentary + -ian.

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campfire (n.)

also camp-fire, "fire in a camp for warmth or cooking," 1835, from camp (n.) + fire (n.). In the GAR (Civil War Northern veterans' society), "a meeting or reunion of members of a post" (1874).

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unpleasantness (n.)
1540s, "state or quality of being unpleasant," from unpleasant + -ness. By 1835 as "a slight quarrel, a minor misunderstanding." The late unpleasantness as a humorously polite Southern description of the American Civil War is attested from 1868.
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insurrection (n.)
"an uprising against civil authority," early 15c., insurreccion, from Old French insurreccion or directly from Late Latin insurrectionem (nominative insurrectio) "a rising up," noun of action from past participle stem of insurgere "to rise up" (see insurgent).
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kepi (n.)
soldier's peaked cap, 1861, from French képi (19c.), from German Swiss käppi, diminutive of German Kappe "a cap," from Late Latin cappa "hood, cap" (see cap (n.)). The usual style of uniform cap in the American Civil War.
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Dr. Pepper (n.)

soft drink, patented 1906 by the Dr. Pepper Co., Dallas, Texas; said to have been named for U.S. physician Dr. Charles Pepper (1830-1903), medical doctor and Confederate surgeon during the Civil War.

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