Etymology
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Palmyra 

city of ancient Syria, from Greek Palmyra. Related: Palmyrene.

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interurban (adj.)

1883, from inter- "between" + Latin urbs "city" (see urban (adj.)).

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Metroliner (n.)

U.S. high-speed inter-city train, 1969, from metropolitan + liner.

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faience (n.)

fine kind of pottery or earthenware, 1714, from French faïence (16c.), probably from Fayence, French form of Faenza, city in Italy that was a noted ceramics center 16c. The city name is Latin faventia, literally "silence, meditation," perhaps a reference to a tranquil location.

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Nanking 

city in China, literally "southern capital," from Chinese nan "south" + jing "capital."

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latakia (n.)

type of fine Turkish tobacco, 1833, from Latakia, city in Syria (see Laodicean).

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Chernobyl 

city in Ukraine (Ukrainian Chornobyl), from Russian chernobylnik "mugwort." Site of 1986 nuclear disaster.

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bialy (n.)

bagel with onion flakes sprinkled on it, by 1936, ultimately short for Białystok, city in modern Poland. The city is named for the Biała river (literally White River), that flows past it, from Polish biały "white" + stok "slope."

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seaport (n.)

"a harbor on the sea; a city or town on such a harbor," 1590s, from sea + port (n.1).

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Waterford 

city in southeastern Ireland; 1783 in reference to a type of glassware manufactured there.

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