Etymology
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Pisa 
Italian city, from Etruscan, of uncertain meaning. Related: Pisan.
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Grenoble 
city in southeastern France, from Roman Gratianopolis, named for 4c. roman emperor Flavius Gratianus. During the French Revolution the city was briefly renamed Grelibre, as if from noble.
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Baqubah 
city in Iraq, from Arabic baya 'kuba "Jacob's house."
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Indianapolis 
city in Indiana, U.S., founded 1821, from Indiana + -polis.
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Bordeaux 
city in southwestern France, Roman Burdigala (1c.), perhaps from a Celtic or pre-Celtic source the sense of which has been lost. From 1560s as a type of wine imported from the city.
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Florentine (adj.)
1540s, literally "of or pertaining to the Italian city of Florence," from Latin Florentinus, from Florentia, the Roman name of the city (see Florence). Earliest reference in English is to a type of textile fabric. As a noun from 1590s.
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Honolulu 
chief city of Hawaii, from Hawaiian hono "port" + lulu "calm."
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Mogadishu 
city in Somalia, from Arabic mukaddas "holy."
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Philly 

familiar or colloquial shortening of Philadelphia, attested by 1890, but from 1858 as the popular name of a ferry boat of that name that crossed the Delaware River from the city to Camden, and a city baseball team has been called the Phillies since 1883.

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Athens 
city of ancient Attica, capital of modern Greece, from Greek Athenai (plural because the city had several distinct parts), traditionally derived from Athena, but probably assimilated from a lost name in a pre-Hellenic language.
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