Etymology
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romanticize (v.)

"render romantic in character," 1818, from romantic + -ize. Related: Romanticized; romanticizing; romanticization.

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practicality (n.)

"character of being concerned with material considerations," 1809, from practical + -ity. Related: Practicalities.

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Peck's bad boy 

"unruly or mischievous child," 1883, from fictional character created by George Wilbur Peck (1840-1916).

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tyrannous (adj.)
"of tyrannical character," late 15c., from Latin tyrannus (see tyrant) + -ous.
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convergence (n.)

"tendency to one point, character or fact of converging," 1713, from converge + -ence. Related: Convergency.

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geloscopy (n.)
"divination of a person's qualities or character by laughter," 1730s, from Greek gelos "laughter" + -scopy.
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impersonation (n.)
1800, "personification;" 1825 as "an acting of a part or character;" noun of action from impersonate (v.).
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radicality (n.)

"state or character of being radical," in any sense, 1640s, from radical (adj.) + -ity.

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dryness (n.)

"state or character of being dry," Old English drygnes; see dry (adj.) + -ness.

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ethos (n.)

"the 'genius' of a people, characteristic spirit of a time and place," 1851 (Palgrave) from Greek ēthos "habitual character and disposition; moral character; habit, custom; an accustomed place," in plural, "manners," from suffixed form of PIE root *s(w)e- third person pronoun and reflexive (see idiom). An important concept in Aristotle (as in "Rhetoric" II xii-xiv).

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