Etymology
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centigram (n.)

also centigramme, metric measure of weight, "one hundredth of a gram," 1801, from French centigramme; see centi- + gram.

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centavo (n.)

small coin of Spain, Portugal, and some Latin American countries, 1883, from Spanish, from Latin centum "hundred" (see hundred).

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centurial (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a century," c. 1600, from Latin centurialis, from centuria "group of one hundred" (see century). 

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certified (adj.)

"attested by certificate," 1610s, past-participle adjective from certify. Certified public accountant attested from 1896; certified mail from 1955.

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cestus (n.1)

"a girdle," a belt worn around the waist in ancient Greece, 1570s, from Latinized form of Greek kestos, noun use of an adjective meaning "stitched, embroidered," from kentein "to prick," from PIE root *kent- "to prick, jab" (see center (n.)). Especially the magical love-inspiring girdle of Aphrodite/Venus.

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ceticide (n.)

"whale-killer," 1836, from Latin cetus (see Cetacea) + -cide.

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-cephalic 

word-forming element meaning "having a head" (of a specified type), from Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-).

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center (n.)

late 14c., "middle point of a circle; point round which something revolves," from Old French centre (14c.), from Latin centrum "center," originally the fixed point of the two points of a drafting compass (hence "the center of a circle"), from Greek kentron "sharp point, goad, sting of a wasp," from kentein "stitch," from PIE root *kent- "to prick" (source also of Breton kentr "a spur," Welsh cethr "nail," Old High German hantag "sharp, pointed").

The spelling with -re was popularized in Britain by Johnson's dictionary (following Bailey's), though -er is older and was used by Shakespeare, Milton, and Pope. The meaning "the middle of anything" attested from 1590s. Figuratively, "point of concentration" (of power, etc.), from 1680s. The political use, originally in reference to France, "representatives of moderate views" (between left and right) is from 1837. Center of gravity is recorded from 1650s. Center of attention is from 1868.

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cedilla (n.)

"mark placed under the letter -c- in certain situations," 1590s, from Spanish cedilla, zedilla, literally "little z," from a Latin-like diminutive of Greek zēta "the letter 'z'" (see zed). The mark, mainly used in French and Portuguese (formerly also used in Spanish), was derived from that letter and indicates a "soft" sound in letters in positions where normally they have a "hard" sound. Sometimes the word is used as though it means the entire character ç.

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censure (n.)

late 14c., "judicial sentence," originally ecclesiastical, from Latin censura "judgment, opinion," also "office of a censor," from census, past participle of censere "appraise, estimate, assess" (see censor (n.)). The general sense of "a finding of fault and an expression of condemnation" is from c. 1600.

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