Etymology
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cerium (n.)

metallic element, first isolated in pure form in 1875, named for ceria, the name of the earth from which it was taken, which was discovered in 1803 and named by Berzelius and Hissinger for Ceres, the minor planet, "whose discovery (in 1801) was then one of the most striking facts in physical science" [OED]. The planet was named for the Roman goddess Ceres, from a root meaning "to grow." With metallic element ending -ium. Related: Ceric.

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Cecilia 

fem. proper name, fem. of Cecil (q.v.).

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celebratory (adj.)

"of or pertaining to celebration," 1855, from celebrate + -ory.

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centigram (n.)

also centigramme, metric measure of weight, "one hundredth of a gram," 1801, from French centigramme; see centi- + gram.

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Cepheid (n.)

type of variable star, 1904, from Delta Cephi, the name of the first such star identified, which is in the constellation Cepheus. With -id.

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cero- 

word-forming element meaning "wax, waxy," from Latinized form of Greek kēros "beeswax," a word of unknown origin with no obvious ulterior connections. "As there is no evidence for Indo-European apiculture, we have to reckon with foreign origin for κηρός" [Beekes].

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centavo (n.)

small coin of Spain, Portugal, and some Latin American countries, 1883, from Spanish, from Latin centum "hundred" (see hundred).

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centurial (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a century," c. 1600, from Latin centurialis, from centuria "group of one hundred" (see century). 

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certified (adj.)

"attested by certificate," 1610s, past-participle adjective from certify. Certified public accountant attested from 1896; certified mail from 1955.

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cestus (n.1)

"a girdle," a belt worn around the waist in ancient Greece, 1570s, from Latinized form of Greek kestos, noun use of an adjective meaning "stitched, embroidered," from kentein "to prick," from PIE root *kent- "to prick, jab" (see center (n.)). Especially the magical love-inspiring girdle of Aphrodite/Venus.

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