Etymology
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emaciate (v.)
1620s "cause to lose flesh" (implied in emaciating), from Latin emaciatus, past participle of emaciare "make lean, cause to waste away," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + macies "leanness," from macer "thin" (from PIE root *mak- "long, thin"). Intransitive meaning "become lean, waste away" is from 1640s. Related: Emaciated.
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oscillate (v.)

1726, intransitive, "to vibrate, move backward and forward," as a pendulum does, a back-formation from oscillation, or else from Latin oscillatus, past participle of oscillare "to swing." Transitive sense of "cause to swing backward and forward" is by 1766. From 1917 in electronics, "cause oscillation in an electric current." Related: Oscillated; oscillating.

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hydrogenate (v.)
"cause to combine with hydrogen," 1809, from hydrogen + -ate (2). Related: Hydrogenated; hydrogenation.
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shipwreck (v.)
1580s, "cause to wreck;" c. 1600, "to suffer shipwreck," from shipwreck (n.). Related: Shipwrecked.
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eye (v.)
early 15c., "cause to see;" 1560s, "behold, observe," from eye (n.). Related: Eyed; eyeing.
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rhinovirus (n.)

one of a group of viruses that includes those which cause many common colds, 1961, from rhino- + virus.

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regenerate (v.)

"generate or produce anew," 1550s, a back-formation from regeneration or else from Latin regeneratus, past participle of regenerare "bring forth again" (see regeneration). Originally theological, "cause to be born again, cause to become a Christian;" of body parts from 1590s. Related: Regenerated; regenerating; regenerable. Replaced earlier regeneren (c. 1400), from Old French regenerer.

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obliteration (n.)

"act of obliterating or effacing, a blotting out or wearing out, fact of being obliterated, extinction," 1650s, from Late Latin obliterationem (nominative obliteratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of obliterare "cause to disappear, blot out (a writing)," figuratively "cause to be forgotten, blot out a remembrance" (see obliterate).

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aseptic (adj.)
"free from the micro-organisms that cause putrefaction or fermentation," 1855, from a- (3) "not" + septic. As a noun, "aseptic substance," from 1884.
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HIV (n.)
1986, initialism (acronym) from human immunodeficiency virus, name for either of the two viruses that cause AIDS.
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