Etymology
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vexation (n.)

c. 1400, from Old French vexacion "abuse, harassment; insult, affront," or directly from Latin vexationem (nominative vexatio) "annoyance, harassing; distress, trouble," noun of action from past participle stem of vexare "to harass, trouble" (see vex).

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laceration (n.)

1590s, "act of lacerating;" 1630s, "breach or rend made by tearing;" from French lacération, from Latin lacerationem (nominative laceratio) "a tearing, rending, mutilation," noun of action from past-participle stem of lacerare "tear to pieces, mangle; slander, abuse" (see lacerate).

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lousy (adj.)

mid-14c., lousi, "infested with lice," from louse (n.) + -y (2). Figurative use as a generic adjective of abuse dates from late 14c.; sense of "swarming with" (money, etc.) is American English slang from 1843. Related: Lousiness.

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sheeney (n.)

"a Jew," 1816, of unknown origin. OED points to Russian zhid, Polish żyd, Czech zid "a Jew." Opprobrious by late 19c. and subsequently a vulgar term of abuse, but it was used before c. 1870 by Jews and Gentiles without apparent intent of insult.

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fucker (n.)

1590s, "one who copulates," agent noun from fuck (v.). By 1893 as a general term of abuse (or admiration).

DUCK F-CK-R. The man who has the care of the poultry on board a ſhip of war. ["Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1796]
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bad-mouth (v.)

"abuse (someone) verbally," 1941, probably ultimately from noun phrase bad mouth (1835), in African-American vernacular, "a curse, spell," translating an idiom found in African and West Indian languages. See bad (adj.) + mouth (n.). Related: Bad-mouthed; bad-mouthing.

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misuse (v.)

late 14c., misusen, "use or treat improperly;" from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + use (v.) and in part from Old French mesuser (Modern French méuser), from mis- (2). Meaning "abuse, treat badly, subject to ill-treatment" is attested from 1530s. Related: Misused; misusing; misusage.

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sensual (adj.)

early 15c., "carnal, concerning the body" (in distinction from the spirit or intellect);" mid-15c., "of, affecting, or pertaining to the (physical) senses" (a meaning now obsolete), from Old French sensual, sensuel (15c.) and directly from Late Latin sensualis "endowed with feeling" (see sensuality).

The specific meaning "connected with gratification of the senses" is from late 15c., especially "lewd, unchaste, devoted to voluptuous pleasures." Related: Sensually.

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debase (v.)

1560s, "lower in position, rank, or dignity, impair morally," from de- "down" + base (adj.) "low," on analogy of abase (or, alternatively, from obsolete verb base "to abuse"). From 1590s as "lower in quality or value" (of currency, etc.), "degrade, adulterate." Related: Debased; debasing; debasement.

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furtive (adj.)

16c., from French furtif (16c.), from Latin furtivus "stolen," hence also "hidden, secret," from furtum "theft, robbery; a stolen thing," from fur (genitive furis) "a thief, extortioner," also a general term of abuse, "rascal, rogue," probably from PIE *bhor-, from root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children." Related: Furtiveness.

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