Etymology
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majuscule (adj.)

1704, of a letter, "capital;" 1738 as a noun, "a capital letter," from French majuscule (16c.), from Latin maiuscula (littera), fem. of maiusculus "somewhat larger, somewhat greater," diminutive of maior (see major (adj.)).

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Beirut 

Lebanese capital, from Hebrew, literally "the wells," from be'erot, plural of be'er "well."

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Phnom Penh 

Cambodian capital, literally "mountain of plenty," from Cambodian phnom "mountain, hill" + penh "full."

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Midi 

"southern France," 1883, from French midi "south," literally "midday" (12c.), from mi "middle" (from Latin medius "middle;" see medial (adj.)) + di "day" (from Latin dies, from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine"). At midday in the northern hemisphere the sun is in the south of the sky. Compare Latin meridianus "of midday, of noon;" also "southerly, to the south" (see meridian), and Middle English mid-dai in its secondary sense "south, to the south" (late 14c.).

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reebok (n.)

South African antelope, 1775, from Dutch form of roebuck.

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Guarani (n.)

South American Indian language, 1797, from a native word.

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Rabat 

Moroccan capital, from Arabic ar-ribat, from ribat "fortified monastery."

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kudu (n.)

South African antelope, 1777, from Kaffir (Xhosa) iqhude.

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Sens 

city in north-central France, Roman Senones, the capital of the Gaulish people of the same name.

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capitalistic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to capital or capitalists," 1870; see capitalist + -ic.

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