Etymology
Advertisement
intemperate (adj.)
"characterized by excessive indulgence in a passion or appetite," late 14c., from Latin intemperatus "excessive, immoderate," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + temperatus "restrained, regulated, limited, moderate, sober, calm, steady," past participle of temperare "to moderate" (see temper (v.)). Related: Intemperately.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Kyoto 
city in Japan, from kyo + to, both meaning "capital." Founded 794 as Heionkyo "Capital of Calm and Peace," it also has been known as Miyako and Saikyo. Kyoto Protocol so called because it was initially adopted Dec. 11, 1997, in the Japanese city.
Related entries & more 
temper (n.)
late 14c., "due proportion of elements or qualities," from temper (v.). The sense of "characteristic state of mind, inclination, disposition" is first recorded 1590s; that of "calm state of mind, tranquility" in c. 1600; and that of "angry state of mind" (for bad temper) in 1828. Meaning "degree of hardness and resiliency in steel" is from late 15c.
Related entries & more 
sedate (v.)

"treat with sedatives," by 1945, a verb to go with the noun derivative of sedative (adj.). The word also existed 17c. in English with a sense of "make calm or quiet." Related: Sedated (by 1953 as an adjective, "under the influence of a sedative drug"); sedating.

Related entries & more 
pacify (v.)

late 15c., pacifien, "appease, allay the anger of (someone)," from Old French pacifier, paciifier, "make peace," from Latin pacificare "to make peace; pacify," from pacificus "peaceful, peace-making," from pax (genitive pacis) "peace" (see peace). Of countries or regions, "to bring to a condition of calm, to restore peace to," late 15c., from the start with suggestions of forced submission and terrorization. Related: Pacified; pacifying.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
composure (n.)

c. 1600, "composition, act of composing, constructing, arrangement" (also, in early use, with many senses now given to compound (n.2)), from compose + -ure. Sense of "tranquility, calmness, composed state of mind" is first recorded 1660s, from composed "calm" (c. 1600). For sense, compare colloquial fall apart "lose one's composure."

Related entries & more 
placable (adj.)

c. 1500, "pleasing, agreeable" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French placable "forgiving, conciliatory" and directly from Latin placabilis "easily appeased or pacified," from placare "to calm, appease, quiet, soothe, assuage," causative of placere "to please" (see please). From 1580s as "capable of being pleased or pacified, easily appeased, willing to forgive." Related: Placably; placability.

Related entries & more 
temperate (adj.)
late 14c., of persons, "modest, forbearing, self-restrained, not swayed by passion;" of climates or seasons, "not liable to excessive heat or cold," from Latin temperatus "restrained, regulated, limited, moderate, sober, calm, steady," from past participle of temperare "to moderate, regulate" (see temper (v.)). Related: Temperately; temperateness. Temperate zone is attested from 1550s.
Related entries & more 
quiet (n.)

c. 1300, "freedom from disturbance or conflict; calm, stillness," from Old French quiete "rest, repose, tranquility" and directly from Latin quies (genitive quietis) "a lying still, rest, repose, peace" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet").

From late 14c. as "inactivity, rest, repose;" from c. 1400 as "absence of noise."

Related entries & more 
coy (adj.)

early 14c., "quiet, modest, demure," from Old French coi, earlier quei "quiet, still, placid, gentle," ultimately from Latin quietus "free; calm, resting" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). Meaning "shy, bashful" emerged late 14c. Meaning "unwilling to commit" is by 1961. Related: Coyly; coyness.

Related entries & more 

Page 4