Etymology
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yclept 
Old English gicliopad; from y- + past participle of cleopian, cpipian "to speak, call; summon, invoke; implore" (see clepe).
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catcall (n.)

also cat-call, 1650s, a type of noisemaker (Johnson describes it as a "squeaking instrument") used to express dissatisfaction in play-houses, from cat (n.) + call (n.); presumably because it sounded like an angry cat. As a verb, attested from 1734.

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phone (v.)

"to call on the telephone," 1884, colloquial, from phone (n.). Related: Phoned; phoning.

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adoption (n.)

mid-14c., from Old French adopcion or directly from Late Latin adoptionem (nominative adoptio) "a taking as one's child," shorter form of adoptatio, noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin adoptare "chose for oneself, take by choice, select, adopt," especially "to take into a family, adopt as a child," from ad "to" (see ad-) + optare "choose, wish, desire," from PIE root *op- (2) "to choose" (see option (n.)).

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pro-life (adj.)

"opposed to abortion," first attested 1976, from pro- + life. Used earlier in a more general sense of "enhancing life." Hostile alternative anti-choice attested 1978 in Ms. magazine (compare pro-choice).

What hypocrisy to call such anti-humanitarian people 'pro-life.' Call them what they are — antichoice. [Ms. magazine, Oct. 8, 1978]
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caller (n.)
c. 1500, "one who proclaims," agent noun from call (v.). Meaning "one who announces step changes at a dance" is short for caller-out (1882). Meaning "a social visitor" is attested from 1786; as "one who places a telephone call," 1880.
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name (v.)
Origin and meaning of name

Old English namian "to bestow a particular name upon, call, mention by name; nominate, appoint," from Proto-Germanic *nōmōjanan (source also of Old Saxon namon, Old Frisian nomia "to name, call," Middle Dutch noemen, namen), from the source of name (n.). Related: Named; naming.

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vox 

Latin, literally "voice," which is the source of vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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invoke (v.)

late 15c., from Old French invoquer, envoquer, envochier "invoke, implore" (12c.), from Latin invocare "call upon, implore," from in- "upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Related: Invoked; invoking.

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opine (v.)

mid-15c., opinen, "express an opinion or opinions; to think, suppose," also transitive, "be of the opinion that," from Old French oppiner, opiner (15c.) and directly from Latin opinari "have an opinion, be of opinion, suppose, conjecture, think, judge," which is of unknown origin. It is traditionally considered to be related to optare "to desire, choose" (see option), but de Vaan's sources find the evidence of this weak. Related: Opined; opining.

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