Etymology
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whatchamacallit (n.)
1928, compressed form of phrase "what you may call it." What-do-you-call-it is from 1630s. Earliest recorded variant is what-calle-ye-hym, attested from late 15c. What's-his-name for "unspecified person" is attested from 1690s; variant what's-his-face is first recorded 1967.
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evocation (n.)

"a calling or bringing forth from concealment," 1570s, from Latin evocationem (nominative evocatio) "a calling forth, a calling from concealment," noun of action from past participle stem of evocare "call out, summon; call forth, rouse, appeal to," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Evocatio was used of the Roman custom of petitioning the gods of an enemy city to abandon it and come to Rome; it also was used to translate the Platonic Greek anamnesis "a calling up of knowledge acquired in a previous state of existence."

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catcall (n.)

also cat-call, 1650s, a type of noisemaker (Johnson describes it as a "squeaking instrument") used to express dissatisfaction in play-houses, from cat (n.) + call (n.); presumably because it sounded like an angry cat. As a verb, attested from 1734.

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yclept 
Old English gicliopad; from y- + past participle of cleopian, cpipian "to speak, call; summon, invoke; implore" (see clepe).
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phone (v.)

"to call on the telephone," 1884, colloquial, from phone (n.). Related: Phoned; phoning.

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adoption (n.)

mid-14c., from Old French adopcion or directly from Late Latin adoptionem (nominative adoptio) "a taking as one's child," shorter form of adoptatio, noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin adoptare "chose for oneself, take by choice, select, adopt," especially "to take into a family, adopt as a child," from ad "to" (see ad-) + optare "choose, wish, desire," from PIE root *op- (2) "to choose" (see option (n.)).

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caller (n.)
c. 1500, "one who proclaims," agent noun from call (v.). Meaning "one who announces step changes at a dance" is short for caller-out (1882). Meaning "a social visitor" is attested from 1786; as "one who places a telephone call," 1880.
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pro-life (adj.)

"opposed to abortion," first attested 1976, from pro- + life. Used earlier in a more general sense of "enhancing life." Hostile alternative anti-choice attested 1978 in Ms. magazine (compare pro-choice).

What hypocrisy to call such anti-humanitarian people 'pro-life.' Call them what they are — antichoice. [Ms. magazine, Oct. 8, 1978]
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name (v.)
Origin and meaning of name

Old English namian "to bestow a particular name upon, call, mention by name; nominate, appoint," from Proto-Germanic *nōmōjanan (source also of Old Saxon namon, Old Frisian nomia "to name, call," Middle Dutch noemen, namen), from the source of name (n.). Related: Named; naming.

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vox 

Latin, literally "voice," which is the source of vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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