Etymology
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shout (n.)

"a loud call, a vehement and sudden cry," also sometimes "clamor, uproar;" mid-14c., from shout (v.).

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opt (v.)

"wish for, choose, desire," 1877, from French opter "to choose" (16c.), from Latin optare "choose, desire" (see option). For the first few years only in English in a French context. An earlier word for the same thing was optate (1610s), from Latin optatus. To opt out "choose not to participate" is by 1922. Related: Opted; opting.

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catcall (n.)

also cat-call, 1650s, a type of noisemaker (Johnson describes it as a "squeaking instrument") used to express dissatisfaction in play-houses, from cat (n.) + call (n.); presumably because it sounded like an angry cat. As a verb, attested from 1734.

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phone (v.)

"to call on the telephone," 1884, colloquial, from phone (n.). Related: Phoned; phoning.

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name (v.)
Origin and meaning of name

Old English namian "to bestow a particular name upon, call, mention by name; nominate, appoint," from Proto-Germanic *nōmōjanan (source also of Old Saxon namon, Old Frisian nomia "to name, call," Middle Dutch noemen, namen), from the source of name (n.). Related: Named; naming.

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yclept 

Old English gicliopad; from y- + past participle of cleopian, cpipian "to speak, call; summon, invoke; implore" (see clepe).

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exclamatory (adj.)

"using, containing, or expressing exclamation," 1590s, from Latin exclamat-, past-participle stem of exclamare "to call out" (see exclaim) + -ory.

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caller (n.)

c. 1500, "one who proclaims," agent noun from call (v.). The meaning "one who announces step changes at a dance" is short for caller-out (1882). The meaning "a social visitor" is attested from 1786; as "one who places a telephone call," 1880.

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evocation (n.)

"a calling or bringing forth from concealment," 1570s, from Latin evocationem (nominative evocatio) "a calling forth, a calling from concealment," noun of action from past participle stem of evocare "call out, summon; call forth, rouse, appeal to," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Evocatio was used of the Roman custom of petitioning the gods of an enemy city to abandon it and come to Rome; it also was used to translate the Platonic Greek anamnesis "a calling up of knowledge acquired in a previous state of existence."

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bluff (n.2)

an alternative name for the game of poker, 1824; see bluff (v.). As "an act of bluffing" by 1864. To call (one's) bluff is from 1876.

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