Etymology
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clerkship (n.)

late 15c., "state of being in holy orders," from clerk (n.) + -ship. From 1540s as "function or business of an office clerk."

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balance-sheet (n.)
"statement showing the state of credits and debits in a particular business," 1812, from balance (n.) in the accounting sense + sheet (n.1).
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decorator (n.)

"one whose business is the decoration of dwellings or public edifices," 1700, agent noun in Latin form from decorate.

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associate (n.)
1530s, "a partner in interest or business," from associate (adj.). Meaning "one admitted to a subordinate degree of membership" is from 1812.
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committee (n.)

late 15c., "person appointed to attend to any business, person to whom something is committed," from Anglo-French commite; see commit + -ee.

From 1620s as "body of persons, appointed or elected, to whom some special business or function has been entrusted;" a new formation or else an extended sense of the old noun. Related: Committeeman; committeeship.

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distillery (n.)

1670s, "act of distilling;" see distill + -ery. Meaning "business of distilling" is by 1736; that of "building and works for distilling" is by 1759.

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merchandise (n.)

mid-13c., marchaundise, "trading, commerce, action or business of buying and selling goods or commodities for profit;" mid-14c., "commodities of commerce; wares, movable objects, and articles for sale or trade," from Anglo-French marchaundise, Old French marcheandise "goods, merchandise; trade, business" (12c.), from marchaunt "merchant" (see merchant). The plural had become obsolete in English by late 19c.

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M.B.A. 

by 1917, American English, abbreviation of Masters of Business Administration, an educational degree attested by that name by 1912.

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IBM 
also (in early use) I.B.M., initialism (acronym) attested by 1921 from International Business Machines Co.; the company name in use from 1918.
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money-order (n.)

1802, "an order, payable on sight, issued at one post office and payable at another," from money + order (n.) in the business sense.

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