Etymology
Advertisement
coeval (adj.)

"having the same age, having lived for an equal period," 1620s, from Late Latin coaevus"of the same age," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + aevum "an age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity"). As a noun from c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tuba (n.)
1852 in reference to a modern, large, low-pitched brass musical instrument, from French tuba, from Latin tuba (plural tubae) "straight bronze war trumpet" (as opposed to the crooked bucina), related to tubus (see tube (n.)).
Related entries & more 
patina (n.)

"greenish encrustation on old bronze," 1748, from French patine (18c.), from Italian patina. This appears to be from Latin patina "shallow pan, dish, stew-pan" (from Greek patane "plate, dish," from PIE *pet-ano-, from root *pete- "to spread"), but it is uncertain why, as patina was found on many ancient objects other than bronze plates and pans. It was considered to add greatly to the beauty of antique bronzes, hence the sense of "refinement, cultural sophistication" recorded by 1933. Extended by the 1890s to the surface textures of other works of decorative arts.

Related entries & more 
longevity (n.)

1610s, from Late Latin longaevitatem (nominative longaevitas) "great age, long life," from Latin longaevus "of great age, ancient, aged," from longus "long" (see long (adj.)) + aevum "lifetime, age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
discobolus (n.)

"a discus-thrower," 1727, from Latin, from Greek diskobolos, from diskos "quoit, discus" (see disk (n.)) + -bolos "thrower," related to ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach"). Especially in reference to a famous ancient Greek bronze statue by Myron (5c. B.C.E.), known now only through Roman copies.

Related entries & more 

Page 4