Etymology
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hair (n.)

Old English hær "hair, a hair," from Proto-Germanic *hēran (source also of Old Saxon, Old Norse, Old High German har, Old Frisian her, Dutch and German haar "hair"), perhaps from PIE *ghers- "to stand out, to bristle, rise to a point" (source also of Lithuanian šerys "bristle;" see horror).

Spelling influenced by Old Norse har and Old English haire "haircloth," from Old French haire, from Frankish *harja or some other Germanic source (see above). Hair-dye is from 1803. To let one's hair down "become familiar" is first recorded 1850. Homeopathic phrase hair of the dog (that bit you), remedy from the same thing that caused the malady, especially a drink on the morning after a debauch, 1540s in English, is in Pliny.

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marlin (n.)

large marine game-fish, 1917, shortening of marlinspike fish (1907), from marlinspike, name of a pointed iron tool used by sailors; the fish was so called from the shape of its elongated upper jaw.

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Spitz (n.)
breed of small Pomeranian dog, 1842, from German Spitz, Spitzhund, from spitz "pointed" (see spit (n.2)). So called from the tapering shape of its muzzle.
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alpenstock (n.)
"long iron-pointed staff used for hiking in mountains," 1829, German, literally "Alpine stick;" see Alp + stock (n.1).
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rocket (n.1)

garden plant of the cabbage family, c. 1500, rokette, from French roquette (16c.), perhaps via Italian rochetta, diminutive of ruca "a kind of cabbage," from Latin eruca "colewort," perhaps so called for its downy stems and related to ericus "hedgehog," also "a beam set with spikes" (from PIE *ghers- "to bristle;" see horror).

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piercer (n.)

mid-14c., percer "pointed tool, that which pierces;" early 15c., "one who pierces," agent noun from pierce (v.) or from Old French percëior.

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stigma (n.)
1590s (earlier stigme, c. 1400), "mark made on skin by burning with a hot iron," from Latin stigma (plural stigmata), from Greek stigma (genitive stigmatos) "mark of a pointed instrument, puncture, tattoo-mark, brand," from root of stizein "to mark, tattoo," from PIE root *steig- "to stick; pointed" (see stick (v.)).

Figurative meaning "a mark of disgrace" in English is from 1610s. Stigmas "marks resembling the wounds on the body of Christ, appearing supernaturally on the bodies of the devout" is from 1630s; earlier stigmate (late 14c.), from Latin stigmata.
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horrific (adj.)
"causing horror," 1650s, from French horrifique or directly from Latin horrificus "dreadful, exciting terror," literally "making the hair stand on end," from horrere "be terrified, bristle, to stand on end" (see horror) + -ficus "making, doing," from combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). An older adjective was horriferous (1620s). Related: Horrifically.
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Mogen David 

"star of David," six-pointed star, symbol of Judaism or Zionism, 1904, from Hebrew maghen Dawidh "shield of David," king of Judah and Israel, who died c. 973 B.C.E.

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canine (adj.)
c. 1600, "pertaining to one of the four sharp-pointed tearing teeth between the incisors and the molars," from canine (n.) or Latin caninus. Meaning "pertaining to a dog or dogs" is from 1620s.
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