Etymology
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generable (adj.)
mid-15c., "capable of being begotten, that may be produced," from Latin generabilis, from generare "to bring forth" (see generation).
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roughen (v.)

"make rough, bring into a rough condition," 1580s, from rough (adj.) + -en (1). Related: Roughened; roughening.

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fetch (v.)

Middle English fecchen, from Old English feccan "to bring, bring to; seek, gain, take," apparently a variant of fetian, fatian "bring near, bring back, obtain; induce; marry," which is probably from Proto-Germanic *fetan (source also of Old Frisian fatia "to grasp, seize, contain," Old Norse feta "to find one's way," Middle Dutch vatten, Old High German sih faggon "to mount, climb," German fassen "to grasp, contain"). This would connect it to the PIE verb for "to walk" derived from root *ped- "foot."

With widespread sense development: to "reach," "deliver," "effect," "make (butter), churn" (19c.), "restore to consciousness" (1620s), also various nautical senses from 16c.-17c.; meaning "to bring in as equivalent or price" is from c. 1600. In 17c. writers on language didn't derive a word's etymology; they fetched it. As what a dog does, c. 1600, originally fetch-and-carry. Variant form fet, a derivation of the original Old English version of the word, survived as a competitor until 17c. Related: Fetched; fetching.

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restore (v.)

c. 1300, restoren, "to give back," also, "to build up again, repair; renew, re-establish; free from the effects of sin; bring back to a former and better state," from Old French restorer, from Latin restaurare "repair, rebuild, renew." This is from re- "back, again" (see re-) + -staurare, not attested by itself but also in instaurare "to set up, establish; renew, restore," etc.,  from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

From late 14c. as "to cure, heal, bring back to a vigorous state;" of objects, beliefs, etc., "bring back to an original state or condition," 1670s. Related: Restored; restoring.

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reorganize (v.)

also re-organize, "bring again into an organized state," 1680s, from re- "again" + organize (v.). Related: Reorganized; reorganizing.

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brown-bag (v.)
"to bring lunch or liquor in a brown paper bag," 1970, from brown (adj.) + bag (n.). Related: Brown-bagging.
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create (v.)

"to bring into being," early 15c., from Latin creatus, past participle of creare "to make, bring forth, produce, procreate, beget, cause," related to Ceres and to crescere "arise, be born, increase, grow," from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow." De Vaan writes that the original meaning of creare "was 'to make grow', which can still be found in older texts ...." Related: Created; creating.

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consummate (v.)

mid-15c., "to bring to completion, finish by completing what was intended," from Latin consummatus, past participle of consummare "to sum up, make up, complete, finish," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + summa "sum, total," from summus "highest" (see sum (n.)).

Meaning "to bring a marriage to completion" (by sexual intercourse) is from 1530s. Related: Consummated; consummating.

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disaggregate (v.)

"separate into component parts," 1803, from dis- "reverse, opposite of" + aggregate (v.) "bring together in a sum or mass." Related: Disaggregated; disaggregating; disaggregation.

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condottiere (n.)

"professional leader of a mercenary troop," 1794, from Italian condottiere, from condotto "to conduct," from Latin conducere "to lead or bring together" (see conduce).

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