Etymology
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viaduct (n.)

1816, from Latin via "road" (see via) + -duct as in aqueduct. French viaduc is a 19c. English loan-word.

An extensive bridge consisting, strictly of a series of arches of masonry, erected for the purpose of conducting a road or a railway a valley or a district of low level, or over existing channels of communication, where an embankment would be impracticable or inexpedient; more widely, any elevated roadway which artificial constructions of timber, iron, bricks, or stonework are established. [Century Dictionary]

But the word apparently was coined by English landscape gardener Humphry Repton (1752-1818) for an architectural feature, "a form of bridge adapted to the purposes of passing over, which may unite strength with grace, or use with beauty ...."

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abutment (n.)
Origin and meaning of abutment

1640s, "that which borders on something else, the part abutting on or against," from abut (v.) + -ment. Originally any junction; the architectural usage, "solid structure where one arch of a bridge, etc., meets another" is attested from 1793 (the notion is of the meeting-place of the arches of a bridge, etc.).

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Bristol 
City in western England, Middle English Bridgestow, from Old English Brycgstow, literally "assembly place by a bridge" (see bridge (n.) + stow). A local peculiarity of pronunciation adds -l to words ending in vowels. Of a type of pottery, 1776; of a type of glass, 1880. In British slang, "breast," 1961, from Bristol cities, rhyming slang for titties.
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punt (n.2)

"flat-bottomed, square-ended, mastless river boat," c. 1500, perhaps a local survival of late Old English punt, which probably is from British Latin ponto "flat-bottomed boat" (see OED), a kind of Gallic transport (Caesar), also "floating bridge" (Gellius), from Latin pontem (nominative pons) "bridge" (from PIE root *pent- "to tread, go;" see find (v.)). Or from or influenced by Old French cognate pont "large, flat boat." Compare pontoon.

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transpontine (adj.)
1844, in a London context in reference to the area south of the Thames, from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + pontine, from stem of pons "bridge" (see pons).
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intercrural (adj.)
"between the thighs," or in medicine, "between leg-like structures," 1690s, from inter- "between" + Latin crus "shin, shank, (lower) leg; supports of a bridge," from Proto-Italic *krus-, which is of uncertain origin.
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girder (n.)
"main supporting wooden beam that carries flooring," 1610s, agent noun from gird, on notion of something that "holds up" something else. Used of iron bridge supports from 1853.
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Yarborough (n.)
in bridge/whist, a hand with no card above a nine, 1874, said to be so called for an unnamed Earl of Yarborough who bet 1,000 to 1 against its occurrence.
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mah-jongg (n.)

tile-based game originally from China, 1922, from dialectal Chinese (Shanghai) ma chiang, name of the game, literally "sparrows," from ma "hemp" + chiang "little birds." The game so called from the design of the pieces. It had a vogue in Europe and the U.S. 1922-23 and for a time threatened to supplant bridge in popularity.

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trestle (n.)
early 14c., "a support for something," from Old French trestel "crossbeam" (12c., Modern French tréteu), presumed to be an alteration of Vulgar Latin *transtellum, diminutive of transtrum "beam, crossbar" (see transom). Specific meaning "support for a bridge" is recorded from 1796.
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