Etymology
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attract (v.)

early 15c., attracten, "draw (objects or persons) to oneself," also a medical term for the body's tendency to absorb fluids, nourishment, etc., or for a poultice treatment to "draw out" diseased matter; from Latin attractus, past participle of attrahere "to draw, pull; to attract," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)).

Of physical forces (magnets, etc.), from 17c. The figurative sense of "be attractive, draw to oneself the eyes or attentions of others" is from 1690s. Related: Attracted; attracting.

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self-esteem (n.)

1650s, "good opinion of oneself," especially "a too high estimate of oneself," from self- + esteem (n.). Popularized by phrenology, which assigned it a "bump" (Spurzheim, 1815). Related: Self-estimation.

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shore (v.)

mid-14c., shoren, "to prop, support with or as if by a prop," from or related to shore (n.) "a prop, a support" (late 13c.); words of obscure etymology though widespread in Germanic (Middle Dutch schooren "to prop up, support;" Middle Low German schore "a barrier;" Old Norse skorða "piece of timber set up as a support"). Related: Shored; shoring.

The noun survives in technical senses, "post or beam for temporary support of something" (mid-15c.), especially an oblique timber to brace the side of a building or excavation.

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bracket (v.)
1797, of printed matter, "to enclose in brackets," from bracket (n.). Also, "to couple or connect with a brace" (1827), also figurative, "to couple one thing with another" in writing (1807). Artillery rangefinding sense is from 1903, from the noun (1891) in the specialized sense "distance between the ranges of two shells, one under and one over the object." Related: Bracketed; bracketing. In home-building and joinery, bracketed is attested by 1801.
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arrogant (adj.)
"disposed to give oneself undue importance, aggressively haughty," late 14c., from Old French arrogant (14c.), from Latin arrogantem (nominative arrogans) "assuming, overbearing, insolent," present participle of arrogare "to claim for oneself, assume," from ad "to" (see ad-) + rogare "to ask, entreat, request," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line." Related: Arrogantly.
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self-love (n.)

"the instinct or virtue which directs a person's actions to the promotion of his own welfare," 1560s; see self- + love (n.). In early use especially "love of oneself, particularity to oneself."

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paddle (v.3)

"to move in water by means of paddles," 1670s, from paddle (n.). To paddle one's (own) canoe "do for oneself make one's way by one's own exertions," is from 1828, American English.

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absent (v.)
Origin and meaning of absent
late 14c., "withdraw (oneself), go away, stay away," from Old French absenter "absent (oneself)," from Late Latin absentare "cause to be away," from Latin absentem (see absent (adj.)). Related: Absented; absenting.
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diet (v.)

late 14c., "to regulate one's diet for the sake of health," from Old French dieter, from diete "fare" (see diet (n.1)); meaning "to regulate oneself as to food" (especially against fatness) is from 1650s. Related: Dieted; dieting. An obsolete word for this is banting.

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self-justification (n.)

"justification of oneself," 1650s, from self- + justification.

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