Etymology
Advertisement
attaboy (interj.)
1909, originally in baseball slang, said to be from common pronunciation of "that's the boy!" a cheer of encouragement or approval. I'm the boy for ______ "I'm willing and capable at" is attested from 1843. Related: Attagirl (1924).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
coxswain (n.)

early 14c., "officer in charge of a ship's boat and its crew," from cock "ship's boat" (from Old French coque "canoe") + swain "boy," from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant" (see swain). Short form cox is attested from 1869.

Related entries & more 
bub (n.1)
also bubby, familiar address for males, 1839, perhaps a variation of bud "a little boy" (1848), American English colloquial; perhaps from German bube "boy." But sometimes, along with bud, assumed to be a corruption of brother (compare buddy, bubba).
Related entries & more 
puerility (n.)

late 15c., puerilite, "a childish or silly act or expression," from Old French puérilité (15c.), from Latin puerilitatem (nominative puerilitas) "childishness," from puerilis "boyish, youthful; childish, trivial, silly," from puer "child, boy" (from PIE root *pau- (1) "few, little," with sense extended to "small, young;" source also of Latin putus "boy," Sanskrit putrah "son, boy," Avestan puthra- "son, child"). Meaning "puerile character or condition, boyishness" is by 1570s.

Related entries & more 
pedo- 

before vowels ped-, word-forming element meaning "boy, child," from Greek pedo-, combining form of pais "boy, child," especially a son, from PIE root *pau- (1) "few, little." The British form paed- is better because it avoids confusion with the ped- that means "foot" (from PIE root *ped-) and the ped-that means "soil, ground, earth." Compare, from the same root, Sanskrit putrah "son;" Avestan puthra- "son, child;" Latin puer "child, boy," Oscan puklu "child."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bugler (n.)
"one who plays a bugle," 1793; see bugle (n.). Bugle-boy attested from 1817.
Related entries & more 
pederasty (n.)

"carnal union of males with males," especially "sodomy of a man with a boy," c. 1600, from French pédérastie or directly from Modern Latin pæderastia, from Greek paiderastia "love of boys," from paiderastēs "pederast, lover of boys," from pais (genitive paidos) "child, boy" (see pedo-) + erastēs "lover," from erasthai "to love" (see Eros). Related: Pederastic.

Related entries & more 
scout (n.)

"person who scouts, one sent out to gain and bring in information," 1550s, from scout (v.1). Scout-watch  (late 14c.) was an old word for "sentinel, guard." Boy Scout is from 1908, as is Scout for a shortening of it. Scout's honor in reference to Boy Scouting is attested from 1908.

Related entries & more 
lowboy (n.)
also low-boy, "chest of drawers on short legs," 1891, a hybrid from low (adj.) + French bois "wood" (see bush). Compare highboy.
Related entries & more 
highboy (n.)
also high-boy, "tall chest of drawers," 1891, American English (see tallboy); a hybrid, the second element is from French bois "wood" (see bush (n.)).
Related entries & more 

Page 4