Etymology
Advertisement
ally (v.)

late 13c., allien, "join in marriage" (transitive), from Old French alier "combine, unite," from a differentiated stem of aliier (from Latin alligare "bind to, tie to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ligare "to bind, bind one thing to another, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). The meaning "form an alliance, join, associate" is late 14c. Related: allied; allying.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bowline (n.)
also bow-line, type of rope on a sailing ship, early 14c. (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), apparently connected with the bow (n.2) of a ship, but attested earlier than that word and not pronounced the same.
Related entries & more 
oxbow (n.)

also ox-bow, early 14c., ox-boue, "bow-shaped wooden collar for an ox," from ox + bow (n.1). Meaning "semicircular bend in a river" is from 1797, American English (New England), so called from the resemblance of the shape. The meaning "curved lake left after an oxbow meander has been cut off by a change in the river course" is from 1898.

Related entries & more 
bowyer (n.)
"maker of bows," attested late 12c. as a surname, from bow (n.1) + -yer.
Related entries & more 
lariat (n.)
rope or cord used for tying or catching horses, 1832, American English, from Spanish la reata "the rope," from reatar "to tie against," from re- "back" (see re-) + atar "to tie," from Latin aptare "to join," from aptus "fitted" (see apt). Compare lasso.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
denouement (n.)

"the solution of a mystery, the winding up of a plot, the outcome of a course of conduct," 1752, from French dénouement "an untying" (of plot), from dénouer "untie" (Old French desnouer) from des- "un-, out" (see dis-) + nouer "to tie, knot," from Latin nodus "a knot," from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie."

Related entries & more 
liable (adj.)

mid-15c., "bound or obliged by law," from Old French lier, liier "to bind, tie up, fasten, tether; bind by obligation" (12c.), from Latin ligare "to bind, to tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). With -able.

Perhaps it is from an Anglo-French *liable, or from an unattested word in Old French or Medieval Latin. The general sense of "exposed to" (something undesirable) is attested by 1590s. The unetymological use for "likely" is attested by 1850.

Related entries & more 
league (n.1)

"alliance," mid-15c., ligg, from French ligue "confederacy, league" (15c.), from Italian lega, from legare "to tie, to bind," from Latin ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). Originally among nations, subsequently extended to political associations (1846) and sports associations (1879). League of Nations is attested from 1917 (created 1919).

Related entries & more 
lictor (n.)

late 14c., from Latin lictor "official attendant upon a magistrate," literally "binder," from past participle stem of *ligere "to bind, collect," collateral form of ligare "to bind, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind").

Related entries & more 
untie (v.)
Old English untigan "loosen, unchain," from un- (2) "opposite of" + tie (v.). Related: Untied; untying.
Related entries & more 

Page 4