Etymology
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tit for tat 

1550s, possibly an alteration of tip for tap "blow for blow," from tip (v.3) "tap" + tap "touch lightly." Perhaps influenced by tit (n.2).

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conflate (v.)

mid-15c., "to mold or cast from molten metal" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin conflatus, past participle of conflare "to blow up, kindle, light; bring together, compose," also "to melt together," literally "to blow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").

From c. 1600 as "to bring together from various sources." In reference to text, "to form by inadvertent combination of two readings of the same words," from 1885.

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conflation (n.)

mid-15c., "a harmony of the Gospels;" 1620s, "action of fusing together," from Late Latin conflationem (nominative conflatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin conflare "bring together, compose," also "melt together," literally "to blow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow"). Meaning "inadvertent combination of two readings of the same passage" is from 1881.

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inflate (v.)

early 15c., "cause to swell," from Latin inflatus (source also of Italian enfiare, Spanish inflar, French enfler), past participle of inflare "blow into, puff up," figuratively "inspire, encourage," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow"). Economics sense (of prices, currency, etc.) is from 1843. In some senses a back-formation from inflation. Related: Inflated; inflating.

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wham (n.)

"a heavy blow," 1923, of echoic origin.

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afflatus (n.)

"miraculous communication of supernatural knowledge or power," 1660s, from Latin afflatus "a breathing upon, blast," figuratively "inspiration," noun use of past participle of afflare "to blow upon," from ad "to" (see ad-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow"). The literal meaning "a blowing or breathing upon" is rare in English, this sense being taken by afflation.

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bump (n.)

1590s, "protuberance caused by a blow;" 1610s as "a dull-sounding, solid blow;" see bump (v.). The dancer's bump and grind is attested from 1940. To be like a bump on a log "silent, stupidly inarticulate" is by 1863, American English.

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souffle (n.)

light dish, sometimes savory but usually sweet, 1813, from French soufflé, noun use of past participle of souffler "to puff up," from Latin sufflare, from sub "under, up from under" (see sub-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").

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nirvana (n.)

also Nirvana, Nirwana, 1836, in Buddhism, "the condition of a Buddha," from Sanskrit nirvana-s "extinction, disappearance" (of the individual soul into the universal), literally "to blow out, a blowing out" ("not transitively, but as a fire ceases to draw" [Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy, "Hinduism and Buddhism," 1943]; a literal Latinization would be de-spiration), from nis-, nir- "out" + va- "to blow" (from PIE root *we- "to blow"). Figurative sense of "perfect bliss" is from 1895.

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coup de grace (n.)

"a single blow or stroke, dispatching one condemned or mortally wounded to put an end to misery," 1690s, from French coup degrâce, literally "stroke of grace;" the merciful death-blow that ends another's suffering (see coup + grace (n.)).

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