Etymology
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periodontitis (n.)

"periodontal disorder," 1842; see periodontal + -itis "inflammation;" though in this case inflammation often is not a feature of the disease.

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bloodshed (n.)
also blood-shed, c. 1500, "the shedding of (one's) blood," from verbal phrase (attested in late Old English) -- e.g. "there was much blood shed" -- from blood (n.) + past participle of shed (v.). The sense of "slaughter" is much older (early 13c., implied in bloodshedding).
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lifeblood (n.)
also life-blood, 1580s, "blood necessary for life," from life (n.) + blood (n.). Figurative and transferred use for "that which is essential to the life or strength of, that which gives vitality to" is from 1590s.
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sanguine (adj.)

late 14c., "blood-red, of a blood-red color" (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French sanguin (fem. sanguine) and directly from Latin sanguineus "of blood," also "bloody, bloodthirsty," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood" (see sanguinary).

The meaning "cheerful, hopeful, vivacious, confident" is attested by c. 1500, because these qualities were thought in old medicine to spring from an excess or predominance of blood as one of the four humors. The sense of "of or pertaining to blood" (mid-15c.) is rare.

 Also in Middle English as a noun, a type of red cloth (early 14c.). It sometimes was used in the senses now going with sanguinary.

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glycemia (n.)
also glycaemia, "presence or level of sugar in the blood," 1901, from glyco- "sugar" + -emia "condition of the blood."
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curfuffle (n.)

"state of being disordered or ruffled," hence "agitation, perturbation," 1813 (carfuffle), first attested in Scottish writers, from a verb meaning "to disorder, dishevel" (1580s), of obscure origin, probably from a dialect word based on Scottish verb fuffle "to throw into disorder" (1530s). The first element is perhaps as in kersplash, etc. (see ker-); OED points rather to a Gaelic car "twist, bend, turn about".

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bleeding (n.)
late 14c., "a flowing out of blood;" mid-15c. as "a drawing out of blood," verbal noun from bleed (v.).
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cold-blooded (adj.)

also coldblooded; 1590s, of persons, "without emotion, wanting usual sympathies, unfeeling;" of actions, from 1828. The phrase refers to the notion in old medicine that blood temperature rose with excitement. In the literal sense, of reptiles, etc., "having blood very little different in temperature from the surrounding environment," from c. 1600. From cold (adj.) + blood (n.). Related: Cold-bloodedly; cold-bloodedness.

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hemophobia (n.)
1844, from hemo- "blood" + -phobia "fear." Perhaps based on French hémophobie. Originally in reference to fear of medical blood-letting.
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hemoglobin (n.)
also hæmoglobin, coloring matter in red blood cells, 1862, shortening of hæmatoglobin (1845), from Greek haimato-, combining form of haima (genitive haimatos) "blood" (see -emia) + globulin, a type of simple protein, from globule, formerly a word for "corpuscle of blood."
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