Etymology
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blackish (adj.)
"somewhat black, moderately dark," mid-15c., from black (adj.) + -ish.
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raven (adj.)

"black as a raven, lustrously black," 1630s, from raven (n.).

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melano- 

word-forming element meaning "black," from Greek melano-, combining form of melas (genitive melanos) "black, dark, murky,"probably from a PIE root *melh-"black, of darkish color" (source also of Sanskrit malinah "dirty, stained, black," Lithuanian mėlynas"blue," Latin mulleus "reddish"). 

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blacking (n.)
1570s, "thing which makes (something else) black;" c. 1600, "action of making black," verbal noun from black (v.).
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blackie (n.)
also blacky, "a black person," 1815, from black (adj.) + -y (3).
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blackly (adv.)
"with a black or dark appearance," 1560s, from black (adj.) + -ly (2).
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Kali 
a name of Devi, the Hindu mother-goddess, in her black-skinned death-aspect, 1798, from Sanskrit kali, literally "the black one," fem. of kalah "blue-black, black," a word from a Dravidian language. Also taken as the fem. of kala "time" (as destroyer).
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Tucson 
city in Arizona, U.S.A., from Spanish Tucson, from O'odham (Piman) cukson "black base," from cuk "black" + son "base."
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Castor 

one of the divine twins (brother of Pollux), also the name of the alpha star of Gemini, Latin, from Greek Kastor, perhaps literally "he who excels." They were sons of Tyndarus, king of Sparta (but in post-Homeric myth of Zeus in the form of a swan)  and Leda.

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chernozem (n.)

"fertile black soil of Ukraine and southern Russia," 1842, from Russian chernozem, literally "black earth," from chernyi "black," from PIE *kers- "dark, dirty" (see Krishna) + zemlya "earth, soil," from Old Russian zemi "land, earth," from PIE root *dhghem- "earth."

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