Etymology
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generous (adj.)

1580s, "of noble birth," from French généreux (14c.), from Latin generosus "of noble birth," figuratively "magnanimous, generous," from genus (genitive generis) "race, stock" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups). Secondary senses of "unselfish" (1690s) and "plentiful" (1610s) in English were present in French and in Latin. Related: Generously; generousness.

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angiogenesis (n.)
"development of new blood vessels," 1896, from angio- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation."
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parturition (n.)

"act of bringing forth or being delivered of young," 1640s, from Latin parturitionem (nominative parturitio), noun of action from past-participle stem of parturire "be in labor" (see parturient). Middle English had parturite (early 15c.) "a birth, the process of giving birth."

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high-born (adj.)
also highborn, "of noble birth," c. 1300, from high (adv.) + born.
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micturate (v.)

"urinate," by 1835, from micturition; malformed and with an erroneous sense; condemned from its birth.

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cosmogony (n.)

1690s, "a theory of the creation;" 1766 as "the creation of the universe;" 1777 as "science of the origin of the universe," from Latinized form of Greek kosmogonia "creation of the world," from kosmos "world, universe" (see cosmos) + -gonia "a begetting," from gonos "birth" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). Related: Cosmogonal; cosmogonic; cosmogonist.

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gentility (n.)
mid-14c., "nobility of birth, gentle birth," from Old French gentilité (14c.), from Latin gentilitatem (nominative gentilitas) "relationship in the same family or clan," from gentilis "of the same family or clan" (see gentle; also compare gentry). From 1640s as "social superiority." Meaning "state of being gentile" is rare.
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antenatal (adj.)
"before birth," 1798; see ante- "before" + natal "pertaining to birth." Ante-nati was an old term for (in Scotland) those born before the accession of James I to the English throne, also used in U.S. in reference to those born in the colonies before the Declaration of Independence.
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foal (v.)
"give birth (to a foal)," late 14c., from foal (n.). Related: Foaled; foaling.
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epigone (n.)
also epigon, "undistinguished scion of mighty ancestors," (sometimes in Latin plural form epigoni), 1865, from Greek epigonoi, in classical use with reference to the sons of the Seven who warred against Thebes; plural of epigonos "offspring, successor, posterity," noun use of adjective meaning "born afterward," from epi "close upon" (in time), see epi-, + -gonos "birth, offspring," from root of gignesthai "to be born" related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).
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