Etymology
Advertisement
controlling (adj.)

"overbearing," 1570s, present-participle adjective from control (v.). Related: Controllingly.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
gonad (n.)

1880, from Modern Latin gonas (plural gonades), coined from Greek gone, gonos "child, offspring; seed, that which engenders; birth, childbirth; race, stock, family," related to gignesthai "be born," genos "race, birth, descent," from PIE *gon-o-, suffixed form of root *gene- "give birth, beget." Related: gonads; gonadal.

Related entries & more 
postnatal (adj.)

"subsequent to birth," 1831, from post- + natal.

Related entries & more 
natal (adj.)

late 14c., "of or pertaining to birthdays;" mid-15c., "of or pertaining to one's birth," from Latin natalis "pertaining to birth or origin," from natus, past participle of nasci "to be born" (Old Latin gnasci), from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget." It is the learned form of Noel, which was the French vernacular word.

Related entries & more 
CDC 

abbreviation of Centers for Disease Control, renamed 1970 from earlier U.S. federal health lab, originally Communicable Diseases Center (1946). Since 1992, full name is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but the usual initialism (acronym) remains CDC.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
naissance (n.)

"birth, origin," late 15c. (Caxton), from French naissance "birth, parentage, place of origin" (12c.), present participle of naître, from Gallo-Roman *nascere, from Latin nasci "be born" (see genus).

Related entries & more 
monogony (n.)

"asexual reproduction, reproduction by fission or gemmation," 1869, from Greek monos "single, alone" (see mono-) + -gonia "a begetting," from gonos "birth" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). 

Related entries & more 
birthday (n.)

late 14c., from Old English byrddæg, "anniversary or celebration of one's birth" (at first usually a king or saint); see birth (n.) + day. The meaning "day on which one is born" is from 1570s. Birthnight is attested from 1620s.

Related entries & more 
fader (n.)

sound control device, 1931, agent noun from fade (v.).

Related entries & more 
ignoble (adj.)

mid-15c., "of low birth;" 1590s as "not honorable, of low character;" from French ignoble (14c.), from Latin ignobilis "unknown, undistinguished, obscure; of base birth, not noble," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + gnobilis "well-known, famous, renowned, of superior birth," from PIE root *gno- "to know." Related: Ignobly; ignobility.

Related entries & more 

Page 4