Etymology
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aviform (adj.)

"bird-shaped, resembling a bird," 1885, from Latin avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird") + -form.

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anhinga (n.)

fishing bird of the American tropics (also called the snake-bird, water-turkey), 1769, from a Tupi word which is said to mean "snake-bird."

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quetzal (n.)

magnificent bird of Central America with brilliant plumage, 1827, from Spanish quetzal, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) quetzalli, "tail-feather." The full bird name in Nahuatl was quetzaltototl, with tototl "bird."

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avicide (n.)

"slaughter of birds," 1834, from Latin avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird") + -cide.

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avian (adj.)

"resembling or pertaining to birds," 1861, from Latin avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird") + -an.

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ornitho- 

before vowels ornith-, word-forming element meaning "bird, birds," from combining form of Greek ornis (genitive ornithos; plural ornithēs) "a bird," in Attic generally "domestic fowl, cock or hen," which often was added to the specific name of the type of bird, from PIE *or- "large bird" (see erne).

For "bird" Greek also had ptēnon (plural peteina), related to pteron "wing," from the root meaning "to fly."

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condor (n.)

"large, South American bird of prey," c. 1600, from American Spanish, from Quechua (Inca) cuntur, the native name for the bird.

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ocarina (n.)

simple musical instrument with a terra-cotta body, a mouthpiece, and finger-holes, 1877, from Italian ocarina, diminutive of oca "goose" (so called for its shape), from Vulgar Latin *auca, from Latin avicula "small bird," diminutive of avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird").

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auspex (n.)

"one who observes flights of birds for the purpose of taking omens," 1590s, from Latin auspex "interpreter of omens given by birds," from PIE *awi-spek- "observer of birds," from root *awi- "bird" + root *spek- "to observe." Compare Greek oionos "bird of prey," also "bird of omen, omen," and ornis "bird," which also could mean "omen."

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ibis (n.)

stork-like bird, late 14c., from Latin ibis (plural ibes), from Greek ibis, from Egyptian hab, a sacred bird of Egypt.

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