Etymology
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bouncing (adj.)

"vigorous, big, strong," 1570s, present-participle adjective from bounce (v.).

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digit (n.)
Origin and meaning of digit

late 14c., "numeral below 10," from Latin digitus "finger or toe" (also with secondary meanings relating to counting and numerals), considered to be related to dicere "to say, speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). The numerical sense is because numerals under 10 were counted on fingers. The "finger or toe" sense in English is attested from 1640s.

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embiggen (v.)

"to magnify, make larger," 1884; see em- + big (adj.) + -en (1). 

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hulking (adj.)

"big, clumsy," 1690s (through 18c. usually with fellow), from hulk (n.).

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bigly (adv.)

early 14c., "strongly, vehemently," from big + -ly (2). From 1530s as "haughtily, arrogantly."

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bigfoot (n.)

supposed elusive man-like creature of the Pacific Northwest, 1963, from big (adj.) + foot (n.).

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poulaine 

"long-pointed toe of a shoe," mid-15c., from Old French Poulaine, literally "Poland," hence "in the Polish fashion." The style was supposed in Western Europe to have originated there. Compare Cracow.

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Boccaccio 

the name means "big-mouth" in Italian, from boccaccia, augmentative of bocca "mouth" (see bouche).

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dew claw (n.)

also dew-claw, "rudimentary inner toe of the foot, especially the hind foot, of some dogs," 1570s, from claw, but the signification of the first element is obscure (compare dewlap).

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biggie (n.)

1931, "important person," from big in the "important, influential" sense + -ie.

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