Etymology
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yak (v.)

"laugh," 1938, variant of yuck (2); "talk idly," 1950, variant of yack. Related: Yakked; yakking.

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irrisory (adj.)

"given to sneering or laughing derisively at others," 1824, from Late Latin irrisorius "mocking," from irrisor "a mocker," from stem of Latin irridere "to laugh at, make fun of," from assimilated form of in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + ridere "to laugh" (see risible). Related: irrision (1520s), from Latin irrisionem, noun of action from the verb.

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pot-bellied (adj.)

also potbellied, "having a protuberant belly," 1650s, from pot (n.1) + bellied. As a type of stove from 1884.

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cachinnation (n.)

"loud laughter," 1620s, from Latin cachinnationem (nominative cachinnatio) "violent laughter, excessive laughter," noun of action from past-participle stem of cachinnare "to laugh immoderately or loudly," of imitative origin. Compare Sanskrit kakhati "laughs," Greek kakhazein "to laugh loudly," Old High German kachazzen, English cackle, Armenian xaxanc'.

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uterus (n.)

"female organ of gestation, womb," late 14c., from Latin uterus "womb, belly" (plural uteri), from PIE root *udero- "abdomen, womb, stomach" (source also of Sanskrit udaram "belly," Greek hystera "womb," Lithuanian vėderas "sausage, intestines, stomach, lower abdomen," Old Church Slavonic vedro "bucket, barrel," Russian vedro).

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Excalibur (n.)

King Arthur's sword, c. 1300, from Old French Escalibor, corruption of Caliburn, in Geoffrey of Monmouth (c.1140) Caliburnus, apparently from Welsh Caledvwlch probably a variant of the legendary Irish sword name Caladbolg which might mean literally "hard-belly," i.e. "voracious." For first element, see callus; for second, see belly (n.).

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hafla (n.)

in reference to belly-dance performance and social gathering, by 1998, from Arabic hafla "party, social or family gathering."

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midsection (n.)

also mid-section, "middle of the human body, midriff, belly," by 1939, an advertiser's word, from mid (adj.) + section (n.).

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bellyful (n.)

figuratively, "enough and more," 1530s, from belly (n.) + -ful. Older than the literal sense (1570s).

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cachinnate (v.)

"to laugh loudly or immoderately," 1824, from Latin cachinnatum, past participle of cachinnare (see cachinnation). Related: Cachinnated; cachinnating.

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