Etymology
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prescriptivism (n.)

by 1963 in moral philosophy, "the view that moral judgments are prescriptions;" by 1977 in reference to language usage, "the belief that the grammar of a language should conform to its rules," hence often in hostile use, "belief that one variety of a language is superior to others and should be promoted, attempt to establish or maintain rules defining preferred or correct usage;" see prescriptive + -ism. Related: Prescriptivist.

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-theism 
word-forming element meaning "belief (of a specified kind) in God, a god, or gods," from Greek theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -ism.
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apologetics (n.)
"branch of theology which defends Christian belief," 1733, from apologetic (which is attested from early 15c. as a noun meaning "formal defense"); also see -ics.
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expectancy (n.)

"act or state of expecting; anticipatory belief or desire," 1590s, from Medieval Latin expectantia, from Latin expectans/exspectans (present participle of expectare/exspectare "await, desire, hope;" see expect) + -ancy. Related: Expectance.

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undeceived (adj.)

c. 1400, "reliable, accurate, certain," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of deceive (v.). Sense of "freed from deception or false belief" is by 1590s, from undeceive (v.).

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millenarianism 

"doctrine of or belief in the coming of the (Christian) millennium," 1800, from millenarian + -ism. A general doctrine in the early Church, it was in disfavor from 4c., but revived in Protestant denominations from 17c. From 1640s in the form millenarism.

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undeceive (v.)

"to free from deception or false belief," 1590s, from un- (2) "opposite of" + deceive (v.). Related: Undeceived; undeceiving.

We are only undeceived
Of that which, deceiving, could no longer harm. 

[Eliot, "East Coker"]
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silver bullet (n.)
"very effective, almost magical remedy," 1808. The belief in the magical power of silver weapons to conquer foes goes back at least to ancient Greece (as in Delphic Oracle's advice to Philip of Macedon).
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antitheist (n.)

also anti-theist, "one opposed to belief in the existence of a god," 1813; see anti- "opposite to, against" + theist. Related: Antitheistic. Greek antitheos meant "equal to the gods, god-like," from a different sense of anti.

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martyr (v.)

"put to death as punishment for adherence to some religious belief (especially Christianity)," Middle English martiren, from Old French martiriier and in part from Old English gemartyrian, from martyr (n.). Middle English also had a verb martyrize (mid-15c.).

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