Etymology
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clinician (n.)

"one who makes a practical study of disease or sick persons," 1844, from French clinicien, which is formed from Latin clinicus (see clinic) on the model of physicien. Native clinicist is attested from 1860.

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sicko (n.)
1977, from sick (adj.) in the mental sense + ending as in weirdo. Sickie "a pervert" is attested from 1972; sicknik (1959) "pervert, obscene comedian" (applied to Lenny Bruce) has fad ending -nik.
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patient (n.)

"suffering, injured, or sick person under medical treatment," late 14c., from Old French pacient (n.), from the adjective, from Latin patientem "suffering" (see patience). In Middle English also of anyone who suffered patiently.

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mesel 

"leprous" (adj.); "a leper" (n.); both c. 1300, from Old French mesel "wretched, leprous; a wretch," from Latin misellus "wretched, unfortunate," as a noun, "a wretch," in Medieval Latin, "a leper," diminutive of miser "wretched, unfortunate, miserable" (see miser). A Latin diminutive form without diminutive force. Also from Latin misellus are Old Italian misello "sick, leprous," Catalan mesell "sick." The English word is archaic or obsolete since the 1500s, replaced by leper, leprous, but its lexical DNA survives, apparently, as a contamination of measles.

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nauseate (v.)

1630s, "to feel sick, to become affected with nausea" (intrans.), from nauseat- past-participle stem of Latin nauseare "to feel seasick, to vomit," also "to cause disgust," from nausea (see nausea). Related: Nauseated; nauseating; nauseatingly. In its early life it also had transitive senses of "to reject (food, etc.) with a feeling of nausea" (1640s), also figurative, "to loathe, to reject with disgust." Meaning "to create a loathing in, to cause nausea" is from 1650s. Careful writers use nauseated for "sick at the stomach" and reserve nauseous (q.v.) for "sickening to contemplate."

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clinical (adj.)

1780, "pertaining to hospital patients or hospital care," from clinic + -al (2). Meaning "coldly dispassionate" (like a medical report) is recorded from 1928. The earlier adjective was clinic "of or pertaining to the sick-bed" (1620s). Related: Clinically.

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therapy (n.)
1846, "medical treatment of disease," from Modern Latin therapia, from Greek therapeia "curing, healing, service done to the sick; a waiting on, service," from therapeuein "to cure, treat medically," literally "attend, do service, take care of" (see therapeutic).
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deserving (adj.)

"that deserves," 1570s, present-participle adjective from deserve (v.). Related: Deservingly (1550s). Phrase deserving poor, those in need and unable to work through no fault of their own (the old, the sick, the lame, etc.) is by 1801.

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ill (adj.)

c. 1200, "morally evil; offensive, objectionable" (other 13c. senses were "malevolent, hurtful, unfortunate, difficult"), from Old Norse illr "evil, bad; hard, difficult; mean, stingy," a word of unknown origin. Not considered to be related to evil. From mid-14c. as "marked by evil intentions; harmful, pernicious." Sense of "sick, unhealthy, diseased, unwell" is first recorded mid-15c., probably from a use similar to that in the Old Norse idiom "it is bad to me." Slang inverted sense of "very good, cool" is 1980s.

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nosocomial (adj.)

"relating to a hospital," 1849 (earlier in German and French), from Late Latin nosocomium, from Greek nosokomeion "an infirmary," from nosokomein "to take care of the sick," from nosos "disease, sickness," a word of unknown origin, + komein "take care of, attend to." Nosocome was a 17c. word for "hospital."

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