Etymology
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batting (n.2)
"action of striking with a bat," 1610s, verbal noun from bat (v.2). In cricket, from 1773. Baseball batting average is from 1867.
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Wiffle 
hollow, perforated plastic ball, registered trademark name (The Wiffle Ball Inc., Shelton, Connecticut, U.S.), claiming use from 1954. According to the company, designed in 1953 by David N. Mullany "in response to a lack of field space and numerous broken windows by his baseball-playing son," the name based on whiff (q.v.), baseball slang for a missed swing.
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bullpen (n.)
also bull-pen, 1820, "pen or enclosure for bulls," from bull (n.1) + pen (n.2). Baseball sense "area where pitchers warm up before entering a game" is from 1915, perhaps from earlier slang meaning "temporary holding cell for prisoners" (common in American Civil War camps). Bullpen also was the name of a baseball-like game played in U.S. late 19c.
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zinger (n.)
"cruel quip," 1970, from zing + -er (1). Earlier it was baseball slang for "fastball" (by 1957).
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dinger (n.)

"something superlative," 1809, American English, agent noun from ding (v.). Baseball sense of "a home run" is by 1984.

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slider (n.)
1520s, "skater," agent noun from slide (v.). As a type of terrapin, from 1877; as a type of baseball pitch, 1936.
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platoon (v.)
in baseball, "to alternate (a player) with another in the same position," 1967, from platoon (n.), which had been used in team sports since 1941.
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homer (n.)
short for home run, from 1868. It also meant "pigeon trained to fly home from a distance" (1880). As a verb in the baseball sense by 1946. Related: Homered; homering.
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pitching (n.)

late 14c., "act of planting or fixing in the ground," verbal noun from pitch (v.1). From 1650s as "act of throwing or hurling;" specifically in baseball by 1858.

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bunt (n.)
1767, "a push with the head or horns" (of a goat or calf); see bunt (v.). Baseball sense "stop the ball with the bat without swinging the bat" is from 1889.
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