Etymology
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twirler (n.)

1808, agent noun from twirl (v.). As baseball slang for "pitcher," by 1891.

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portsider (n.)

"left-handed person," 1913, American English baseball slang, from port (n.4) in the nautical sense + side (n.).

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assist (n.)

1570s, "an act of assistance," from assist (v.). In the sporting sense attested 1877 in baseball, 1925 in ice hockey.

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baseman (n.)

in baseball, player whose defensive position is at one of the three bases, by 1857, from base (n.) + man (n.).

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at-bat (n.)

"baseball player's turn at the plate," 1912, originally a column heading in statistics tables, from the prepositional phrase.

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slugfest (n.)

"exchange of heavy blows," by 1910, originally in reference to baseball, from slug (n.3) + -fest. Slugging-match "unskillful fistfight" is by 1878.

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lozenge (n.)

early 14c., "plane figure having four equal sides and two acute and two obtuse angles," from Old French losenge "rhombus shape, diamond-shape" (as an ornamental motif in heraldry, etc.); "small square cake; windowpane," etc., a word used for many flat quadrilateral things (Modern French losange). It has cognates in Spanish losange, Catalan llosange, Italian lozanga, but the origin is disputed.

Probably from a pre-Roman Celtic language, perhaps Iberian *lausa or Gaulish *lausa "flat stone" (compare Provençal lausa, Spanish losa, Catalan llosa, Portuguese lousa "slab, tombstone"). From late 14c. as "diamond-shaped cake or wafer;" specific sense "small cake or tablet (originally diamond-shaped) of medicine and sugar, etc., meant to be held in the mouth and dissolved" is from 1520s.

The related words in Continental languages often have a sense "flattery, deceit" (compare Old French losengier "to praise unduly," losenge "flattery, false praise; deceitful friendliness"), which comes probably via the notion of square flat slabs of tombstones and their fulsome epithets. Some of this made its way into Middle English via French. Chaucer uses losenger "flatterer, deceiver;" losengerye "flattery."

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pop-up (n.)

from 1906 as a type of baseball hit; from pop (v.) + up (adv.). As an adjective from 1934 (of a children's book, later toasters, etc.).

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interleague (adj.)

also inter-league, by 1917 in a U.S. baseball sense, from inter- "between" + league (n.). Earlier (1580s) as a verb, "to combine in a league."

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e.r.a. (n.)

1949 in baseball as initialism (acronym) for earned run average. From 1971 in U.S. politics for Equal Rights Amendment.

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