Etymology
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frozen (adj.)
mid-14c., "congealed by cold; turned to or covered with ice," past-participle adjective from freeze (v.). Figurative use is from 1570s. Of assets, bank accounts, etc., from 1922.
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Vauxhall 
popular pleasure garden on south bank of Thames in London, c. 1661-1859; the name is Middle English Faukeshale (late 13c.), "Hall or manor of a man called Falkes," an Old French personal name.
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ria (n.)

"long, narrow inlet of the sea formed by a drowned river valley," from Spanish ria "estuary, river mouth" (adopted as a geological term first in German, 1886), from Latin ripa "stream bank" (see riparian).

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CD 

1979 as an abbreviation of compact disc as a digital system of information storage. By 1959 as an abbreviation of certificate of deposit "written statement from a bank acknowledging it has received a sum of money from the person named" (1819).

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greenback (n.)
"U.S. dollar bill," 1862, so called from the time of their introduction, from green (adj.) + back (n.); bank paper money printed in green ink had been called this since 1778 (as opposed to redbacks, etc.).
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Windsor 
town in Berkshire, Old English Windlesoran (c.1060), literally "bank or slope with a windlass" (Old English *windels). Site of a royal residence, hence Windsor chair (1724), Windsor tie (1895), Windsor knot in a necktie (1953).
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overflow (v.)

Middle English overflouen, from Old English oferfleow "to flow across, flood, inundate," also "to flow over (a brim or bank);" see over- + flow (v.). Common Germanic (Old High German ubarfliozan, German überfliessen, etc.). Related: Overflowed; overflowing.

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Shiloh 
village on the west bank of the Jordan River, perhaps from an alteration of Hebrew shalo "to be peaceful." The American Civil War battle (April 6-7, 1862) was so called for being fought around the Shiloh church in Tennessee, which was destroyed in the battle.
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key (n.2)
"low island," 1690s, from Spanish cayo "shoal, reef," from Taino (Arawakan) cayo "small island;" spelling influenced by Middle English key "wharf" (c. 1300; mid-13c. in place names), from Old French kai "sand bank" (see quay).
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glacis (n.)

"sloping bank" (especially leading up to a fortification), 1670s, from French glacir "to freeze, make slippery," from Old French glacier "to slip, glide," from Vulgar Latin *glaciare "to make or turn into ice," from Latin glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze").

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